vomit

  • 1 vomit — vomit …

    Dictionnaire des rimes

  • 2 Vomit — Vom it, n. [L. vomitus, from vomere, vomitum, to vomit; akin to Gr. ?, Skr. vam, Lith. vemiti. Cf. {Emetic}, {Vomito}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Matter that is vomited; esp., matter ejected from the stomach through the mouth. [1913 Webster] Like vomit… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 vomit — (n.) late 14c., act of expelling contents of the stomach through the mouth, from L. vomitare to vomit often, frequentative of vomere spew forth, discharge, from PIE root *wem to spit, vomit (Cf. Gk. emein to vomit, emetikos provoking sickness;… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4 Vomit — Vom it, v. t. 1. To throw up; to eject from the stomach through the mouth; to disgorge; to puke; to spew out; often followed by up or out. [1913 Webster] The fish . . . vomited out Jonah upon the dry land. Jonah ii. 10. [1913 Webster] 2. Hence,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 vomit — [väm′it] n. [ME < L vomitus, a discharging, vomiting < pp. of vomere, to discharge, vomit < IE base * wemē > Gr emein, to vomit, OE wamm, stain, disgrace] 1. the act or process of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouth …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 Vomit — Vom it, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Vomited}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Vomiting}.] [Cf. L. vomere, vomitum, and v. freq. vomitare. See {Vomit}, n.] To eject the contents of the stomach by the mouth; to puke; to spew. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 vomit — ► VERB (vomited, vomiting) 1) eject matter from the stomach through the mouth. 2) emit in an uncontrolled stream or flow. ► NOUN ▪ matter vomited from the stomach. ORIGIN Latin vomere to vomit …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 vomit — *belch, burp, disgorge, regurgitate, spew, throw up Analogous words: *eject, expel, oust …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 9 vomit — The verb has inflected forms vomited, vomiting …

    Modern English usage

  • 10 vomit — [v] disgorge be seasick*, be sick, bring up*, dry heave*, eject, emit, expel, gag*, heave*, hurl*, puke*, regurgitate, retch, ruminate, spew, spit up, throw up, upchuck*; concepts 179,185,308 …

    New thesaurus

  • 11 vomit — 01. He got seasick, and began to [vomit] after half an hour on the boat. 02. I [vomited] a couple of times last night because I drank too much. 03. He got really drunk at the party, and ended up outside, [vomiting] in the garden. 04. The most… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 12 vomit up — verb eject the contents of the stomach through the mouth After drinking too much, the students vomited He purged continuously The patient regurgitated the food we gave him last night • Syn: ↑vomit, ↑purge, ↑cast, ↑sick, ↑ …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 13 vomit — vom|it1 [ˈvɔmıt US ˈva: ] v [I and T] to bring food or drink up from your stomach out through your mouth, because you are ill ▪ He had swallowed so much sea water he wanted to vomit. ▪ I knew I was really in trouble when I began vomiting blood.… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 14 vomit — [[t]vɒ̱mɪt[/t]] vomits, vomiting, vomited 1) VERB If you vomit, food and drink comes back up from your stomach and out through your mouth. Any product made from cow s milk made him vomit... [V n] She began to vomit blood a few days before she… …

    English dictionary

  • 15 vomit — I UK [ˈvɒmɪt] / US [ˈvɑmɪt] verb [intransitive/transitive] Word forms vomit : present tense I/you/we/they vomit he/she/it vomits present participle vomiting past tense vomited past participle vomited * if you vomit, food comes up from your… …

    English dictionary

  • 16 vomit — I. noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French vomite, from Latin vomitus, from vomere to vomit; akin to Old Norse vāma seasickness, Greek emein to vomit Date: 14th century 1. an act or instance of disgorging the contents of the stomach… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17 Vomit — Matter from the stomach that has come up into and may be ejected beyond the mouth, due to the act of vomiting. When vomit is reddish or the color of coffee grounds, it may mean there is serious internal bleeding. The reddish color may herald… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 18 vomit — verb ADVERB ▪ violently ▪ up ▪ He vomited up all that he had eaten for lunch. VERB + VOMIT ▪ want to ▪ The smell made …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 19 vomit — vom|it1 [ vamıt ] verb intransitive or transitive * if you vomit, food comes up from your stomach and out through your mouth because you are sick vomit vom|it 2 [ vamıt ] noun uncount food or other substances that come up from your stomach and… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 20 vomit — [14] Vomit comes from vomitus, the past participle of Latin vomere ‘vomit’. This was descended from the prehistoric Indo European base *wem , which also produced Greek emeín ‘vomit’ (source of English emetic [17]). => EMETIC …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins


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