principle

  • 1 principle — prin‧ci‧ple [ˈprɪnspl] noun 1. [countable, uncountable] a moral rule or set of ideas that makes you behave in a particular way: • The single European market works on market principles. • As a matter of principle (= a rule that is very important …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 principle — principle, axiom, fundamental, law, theorem are comparable when they denote a proposition or other formulation stating a fact or a generalization accepted as true and basic. Principle applies to a generalization that provides a basis for… …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 3 Principle — Prin ci*ple, n. [F. principe, L. principium beginning, foundation, fr. princeps, cipis. See {Prince}.] 1. Beginning; commencement. [Obs.] [1913 Webster] Doubting sad end of principle unsound. Spenser. [1913 Webster] 2. A source, or origin; that… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 principle — I (axiom) noun accepted belief, adage, admitted maxim, article of belief, article of faith, assertion, assurance, basic doctrine, basic law, basic rule, basic truth, belief, canon, conviction, credo, declaration of faith, decretum, doctrine,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 principle — [prin′sə pəl] n. [ME, altered < MFr principe < L principium: see PRINCIPIUM] 1. the ultimate source, origin, or cause of something 2. a natural or original tendency, faculty, or endowment 3. a fundamental truth, law, doctrine, or motivating …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 principle — ► NOUN 1) a fundamental truth or proposition serving as the foundation for belief or action. 2) a rule or belief governing one s personal behaviour. 3) morally correct behaviour and attitudes. 4) a general scientific theorem or natural law. 5) a… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 principle — late 14c., fundamental truth or proposition, from Anglo Fr. principle, O.Fr. principe, from L. principium (plural principia) a beginning, first part, from princeps (see PRINCE (Cf. prince)). Meaning origin, source is attested from early 15c.… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 8 principle — [n1] law, standard assumption, axiom, basis, canon, convention, criterion, dictum, doctrine, dogma, ethic, form, formula, foundation, fundamental, golden rule*, ground, maxim, origin, postulate, precept, prescript, principium, proposition,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 9 Principle — Prin ci*ple, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Principled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Principling}.] To equip with principles; to establish, or fix, in certain principles; to impress with any tenet, or rule of conduct, good or ill. [1913 Webster] Governors should be… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 principle — /prin seuh peuhl/, n. 1. an accepted or professed rule of action or conduct: a person of good moral principles. 2. a fundamental, primary, or general law or truth from which others are derived: the principles of modern physics. 3. a fundamental… …

    Universalium

  • 11 principle — noun 1 basic general rule ADJECTIVE ▪ basic, broad, central, fundamental, general, underlying ▪ the basic principles of car maintenance ▪ b …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 12 principle — prin|ci|ple W1S3 [ˈprınsıpəl] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(moral rule)¦ 2¦(idea behind something)¦ 3 in principle 4¦(rules of a process)¦ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [Date: 1300 1400; : French; Origin: principe, from Latin principium beginning , from princeps; PRINCE] 1.) …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 principle — prin|ci|ple [ prınsəpl ] noun *** 1. ) count a basic belief, theory, or rule that has a major influence on the way in which something is done: Excellent customer service should be our guiding principle. principle of: It is a basic principle of… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14 principle */*/*/ — UK [ˈprɪnsəp(ə)l] / US noun Word forms principle : singular principle plural principles 1) a) [countable] a basic belief, theory, or rule that has a major influence on the way in which something is done Excellent customer service should be our… …

    English dictionary

  • 15 principle — n. 1) to establish, formulate, lay down a principle 2) to adhere to, apply a principle 3) to betray, compromise one s principles 4) a basic; general; guiding; high; sound; strict principle 5) the principle that + clause (we adhere to the… …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 16 principle — / prInsifipFl/ noun 1 MORAL RULE a) (C, U) a moral rule or set of ideas which makes you behave in a particular way: She resigned on a matter of principle. | the principle of the thing spoken: You shouldn t just take the car without asking, it s… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 Principle — For the term in chemistry, see principle (chemistry). : Not to be confused with principal. A principle is an abstract object which signifies a point (or points) of probability on a subject (e.g., the principle of creativity), which allows for the …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 principle — [[t]prɪ̱nsɪp(ə)l[/t]] ♦♦ principles 1) N VAR: usu poss N, adj N, prep N A principle is a general belief that you have about the way you should behave, which influences your behaviour. Buck never allowed himself to be bullied into doing anything… …

    English dictionary

  • 19 principle — /ˈprɪnsəpəl / (say prinsuhpuhl) noun 1. an accepted or professed rule of action or conduct: a man of good principles. 2. a fundamental, primary, or general truth, on which other truths depend: the principles of government. 3. a fundamental… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 20 principle — 01. My daughter is studying the [principles] of algebra at school these days. 02. Our society supposedly believes in the [principle] of equality for all. 03. Too many successful businessmen seem to have very few [principles] when it comes to… …

    Grammatical examples in English


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