noisy+commotion

  • 1 commotion — I noun affray, agitatio, agitation, altercation, brawl, clamor, clash, conflict, confusion, convulsion, disorder, disorderliness, disorganization, disquiet, disquietude, disturbance, ebullition, embroilment, encounter, entanglement, eruption,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 commotion — ► NOUN ▪ a state of confused and noisy disturbance. ORIGIN Latin, from com altogether + motio motion …

    English terms dictionary

  • 3 commotion — [kə mō′shən] n. [L commotio < commotus, pp. of commovere, to move, disturb < com , together + movere, to MOVE] 1. violent motion; turbulence 2. a noisy rushing about; confusion; bustle 3. Archaic a civil uprising 4. Archaic mental agitation …

    English World dictionary

  • 4 noisy strife — index commotion Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 commotion — noun (singular, uncountable) sudden noisy activity: They heard a commotion downstairs. | cause a commotion: The bar was packed, and the winning touchdown caused an immense commotion …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 6 commotion — commotional, adj. commotive, adj. /keuh moh sheuhn/, n. 1. violent or tumultuous motion; agitation; noisy disturbance: What s all the commotion in the hallway? 2. political or social disturbance or upheaval; sedition; insurrection. [1520 30; < L… …

    Universalium

  • 7 commotion — com|mo|tion [kəˈməuʃən US ˈmou ] n [singular, U] [Date: 1300 1400; : Old French; Origin: Latin commotio, from commovere to move violently , from com ( COM ) + movere to move ] sudden noisy activity ▪ They heard a commotion downstairs. ▪ Everyone… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 8 commotion — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French commocion, from Latin commotion , commotio, from commovēre Date: 15th century 1. a condition of civil unrest or insurrection 2. steady or recurrent motion 3. mental excitement or …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 9 commotion — n. 1 a a confused and noisy disturbance or outburst. b loud and confusing noise. 2 a civil insurrection. Etymology: ME f. OF commotion or L commotio (as COM , MOTION) …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 10 commotion — noun 1》 a state of confused and noisy disturbance. 2》 civil insurrection. Origin ME: from L. commotio(n ), from com altogether + motio (see motion) …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 11 commotion — com•mo•tion [[t]kəˈmoʊ ʃən[/t]] n. 1) violent or tumultuous action or activity; agitation; noisy disturbance 2) political or social disturbance or upheaval • Etymology: 1520–30; < L commōtiō < commovēre (see commove) …

    From formal English to slang

  • 12 tumult — n. 1. Uproar, affray, fray, brawl, feud, row, altercation, squabble, turbulence, bluster, hubbub, fracas, quarrel, outbreak, strife, general riot, mêlée. 2. Violent commotion, turbulence, noisy agitation, confusion. 3. Commotion, disturbance,… …

    New dictionary of synonyms

  • 13 bluster — [blus′tər] vi. [ME blustren, to blow violently < or akin to LowG blüstern, blistern: for IE base see FLUCTUATE] 1. to blow stormily: said of wind 2. to speak or conduct oneself in a noisy, swaggering, or bullying manner vt. 1. to force by… …

    English World dictionary

  • 14 rumpus — noun Etymology: origin unknown Date: 1764 a usually noisy commotion …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 15 Shinto — For other uses, see Shinto (disambiguation). Takachiho gawara. Here is a Sacred ground …

    Wikipedia

  • 16 Thor — For other uses, see Thor (disambiguation). Thor s Battle Against the Ettins (1872) by Mårten Eskil Winge In Norse mythology, Thor (from Old Norse Þórr) is a hammer wielding god associated with thunder, lightning, storms, oak trees, strength, the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 17 Tumult — can refer to: * violent and noisy commotion or disturbance of a crowd * a general outbreak or disorder, riot * mental or emotional disturbance *tUMULt, a record label based in San Francisco. * Tumult , an album by Dutch punk rock band The Ex …

    Wikipedia

  • 18 ruckus — /ruk euhs/, n. 1. a noisy commotion; fracas; rumpus: The losers are sure to raise a ruckus. 2. a heated controversy: Newspapers fostered the ruckus by printing the opponents letters. [1885 90, Amer.; prob. b. RUCTION and RUMPUS] * * * …

    Universalium

  • 19 tumult — /tooh meuhlt, tyooh /, n. 1. violent and noisy commotion or disturbance of a crowd or mob; uproar: The tumult reached its height during the premier s speech. 2. a general outbreak, riot, uprising, or other disorder: The tumult moved toward the… …

    Universalium

  • 20 row — {{11}}row (n.1) line of people or things, O.E. ræw a row, line, from P.Gmc. *rai(h)waz (Cf. M.Du. rie, Du. rij row; O.H.G. rihan to thread, riga line; Ger. Reihe row, line, series; O.N. rega …

    Etymology dictionary


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