lout

  • 1 Lout — Développeur Jeffrey H. Kingston Dernière version 3 …

    Wikipédia en Français

  • 2 Lout — Entwickler Jeffrey H. Kingston Aktuelle Version 3.38 (15. Oktober 2008) Betriebssystem Plattformunabhängig Programmier­sprache C …

    Deutsch Wikipedia

  • 3 lout — lout·ish; lout; lout·ish·ly; lout·ish·ness; …

    English syllables

  • 4 Lout — (lout), v. i. [OE. louten, luten, AS. l[=u]tan; akin to Icel. l[=u]ta, Dan. lude, OHG. l[=u]z[=e]n to lie hid.] To bend; to box; to stoop. [Archaic] Chaucer. Longfellow. [1913 Webster] He fair the knight saluted, louting low. Spenser. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Lout — Lout, v. t. To treat as a lout or fool; to neglect; to disappoint. [Obs.] Shak. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 lout — lout1 [lout] n. [prob. < or akin to ME lutien, to lurk < OE lutian, akin to lutan: see LOUT2] an awkward, ill mannered person; boor vt. Obs. to treat with contempt; flout loutish adj. loutishly adv. loutishness n. lout2 [lout] vi., vt …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 Lout — Lout, n. [Formerly also written lowt.] A clownish, awkward fellow; a bumpkin. Sir P. Sidney. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 lout — [laut] n [Date: 1500 1600; Origin: Perhaps from Old Norse lutr bent down ] a rude, violent man = ↑yob >loutish adj ▪ loutish behaviour >loutishly adv >loutishness n …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 9 lout — [ laut ] noun count FORMAL an unpleasant young man who behaves badly, especially in public => LAGER LOUT …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 10 lout — ► NOUN ▪ an uncouth or aggressive man or boy. DERIVATIVES loutish adjective. ORIGIN perhaps from archaic lout «to bow down» …

    English terms dictionary

  • 11 lout — (n.) 1540s, awkward fellow, clown, bumpkin, perhaps from a dialectal survival of M.E. louten (v.) bow down (c.1300), from O.E. lutan bow low, from P.Gmc. *lut to bow, bend, stoop (Cf. O.N. lutr stooping, which might also be the source of the… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 12 lout — n *boor, churl, clown, clodhopper, bumpkin, hick, yokel, rube Contrasted words: *gentleman, patrician, aristocrat …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 13 lout — [n] boor barbarian, bear, boob*, brute, buffoon, bumpkin, cad, churl, clod, clodhopper, dolt, dork*, goon*, lummox, oaf, philistine, rube, slob*, vulgarian; concept 423 …

    New thesaurus

  • 14 Lout — Infobox Software name = Lout caption = developer = Jeffrey H. Kingston latest release version = 3.36 latest release date = August 3, 2007 operating system = Linux, MS Windows, POSIX compliant systems genre = Text formatting license = GPL website …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 lout — I [[t]laʊt[/t]] n. 1) a clumsy, boorish person; oaf 2) to scorn • Etymology: 1540–50; perh. identical with lout II lout′ish, adj. lout′ish•ly, adv. lout′ish•ness, n. II lout [[t]laʊt[/t]] v. t. v. i. to bend in respect; bow • Etymology:… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 16 lout —    ‘Most sweet lout’ is a term of address used by the Bastard in Shakespeare’s King John. The word ‘lout’ may have been in use in the twelfth century, during King John’s reign, but the Oxford English Dictionary is only able to date it from… …

    A dictionary of epithets and terms of address

  • 17 lout — UK [laʊt] / US noun [countable] Word forms lout : singular lout plural louts an unpleasant young man who behaves badly, especially in public Her sons are just ill mannered louts. • See: lager lout …

    English dictionary

  • 18 lout — n. a stupid lout * * * [laʊt] a stupid lout …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 19 lout — [[t]la͟ʊt[/t]] louts N COUNT (disapproval) If you describe a man or boy as a lout, you are critical of them because they behave in an impolite or aggressive way. ...a drunken lout …

    English dictionary

  • 20 lout — noun (C) a rude, violent man: Get up, you lazy lout! see also: lager lout lager (2) loutish adjective loutishly adverb loutishness noun (U) …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English


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