evacuate

  • 1 Evacuate — E*vac u*ate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Evacuated}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Evacuating}.] [l. evacuatus, p. p. of evacuare to empty, nullify; e out + vacuus empty, vacare to be empty. See {Vacate}.] 1. To make empty; to empty out; to remove the contents of;… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 Evacuate — E*vac u*ate, v. i. 1. To let blood [Obs.] Burton. [1913 Webster] 2. to expel stool from the bowels; to defecate. [PJC] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 evacuate — I verb abscond, absent oneself, break camp, clear out, decamp, depart, disappear, empty, escape, exit, flee, leave, leave empty, locum vacuefacere, make a departure, march out, move out, quit, remove, retreat, run away, send away, take flight,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 evacuate — UK US /ɪˈvækjueɪt/ verb [I or T] WORKPLACE ► to move people or to be moved from a dangerous place to somewhere safe: »be evacuated from sth »Fire broke out and all staff were evacuated from the building …

    Financial and business terms

  • 5 evacuate — 1520s, from L. evacuatus, pp. of evacuare to empty, make void, nullify, used by Pliny in reference to the bowels, used figuratively in L.L. for clear out, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + vacuus empty (see VACUUM (Cf. vacuum)). Earliest sense in… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 evacuate — [v] clear an area; empty abandon, bail out*, cut out, decamp, depart, desert, discharge, displace, eject, expel, forsake, hightail, leave, move out, pack up, pull out, quit, relinquish, remove, run for the hills*, skidaddle*, vacate, withdraw;… …

    New thesaurus

  • 7 evacuate — ► VERB 1) remove from a place of danger to a safer place. 2) leave (a dangerous place). 3) technical remove air, water, or other contents from (a container). 4) empty (the bowels or another bodily organ). DERIVATIVES evacuation noun. ORIGIN …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 evacuate — [ē vak′yo͞o āt΄, ivak′yo͞o āt΄] vt. evacuated, evacuating [< L evacuatus, pp. of evacuare < e , out + vacuare, to make empty < vacuus, empty] 1. to make empty; remove the contents of; specif., to remove air from so as to make a vacuum 2 …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 evacuate — 01. Police had to [evacuate] the building because of a bomb scare. 02. The office tower was well organized for emergencies, so [evacuation] of the entire building only took about 5 minutes. 03. The embassy is working to [evacuate] its staff from… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 10 evacuate — verb ADVERB ▪ immediately ▪ safely, successfully ▪ medically (esp. AmE) ▪ 6 000 soldiers have been medically evacuated since the war began. VERB + EVACUATE …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 11 evacuate — [[t]ɪvæ̱kjueɪt[/t]] evacuates, evacuating, evacuated 1) VERB To evacuate someone means to send them to a place of safety, away from a dangerous building, town, or area. [V n] They were planning to evacuate the seventy American officials still in… …

    English dictionary

  • 12 evacuate */ — UK [ɪˈvækjueɪt] / US [ɪˈvækjuˌeɪt] verb Word forms evacuate : present tense I/you/we/they evacuate he/she/it evacuates present participle evacuating past tense evacuated past participle evacuated 1) [intransitive/transitive] to leave a building… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 evacuate — /i vak yooh ayt /, v., evacuated, evacuating. v.t. 1. to leave empty; vacate. 2. to remove (persons or things) from a place, as a dangerous place or disaster area, for reasons of safety or protection: to evacuate the inhabitants of towns in the… …

    Universalium

  • 14 evacuate — verb a) To leave or withdraw from; to quit; to retire from; as, soldiers from a country, city, or fortress. The firefighters told everyone to evacuate the area as the flames approached. b) To make empty; to empty out; to remove the contents of,… …

    Wiktionary

  • 15 evacuate — v. (D; tr.) to evacuate from; to (the civilians were evacuated from the city to farms) * * * [ɪ vækjʊeɪt] to (the civilians were evacuated from the city to farms) (D; tr.) to evacuate from …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 16 evacuate — e|vac|u|ate [ıˈvækjueıt] v [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: , past participle of evacuare, from vacuus empty ] 1.) [T] to send people away from a dangerous place to a safe place evacuate sb from/to sth ▪ Several families were evacuated from… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 evacuate — verb ( ated; ating) Etymology: Middle English, to draw off morbid humors, from Latin evacuatus, past participle of evacuare to empty, from e + vacuus empty Date: 15th century transitive verb 1. to remove the contents of ; empty 2. to discharge… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 18 evacuate — To accomplish evacuation. [L. e vacuo, pp. vacuatus, to empty out] * * * evac·u·ate i vak yə .wāt vb, at·ed; at·ing vt 1) to remove the contents of <evacuate an abscess> 2) to discharge (as urine or feces) from the body as waste: VOID vi to …

    Medical dictionary

  • 19 evacuate — e|vac|u|ate [ ı vækju,eıt ] verb * 1. ) intransitive or transitive to leave a building or other place because it is not safe: If the alarm sounds, all students should evacuate immediately. a ) transitive to make people leave a building because it …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 20 evacuate — verb 1 (T) to send people to a safe place from a dangerous place: evacuate sb from/to: The villagers were evacuated to the countryside. 2 (I, T) to empty a place by making all the people leave: The whole building has been evacuated. 3 formal to… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English


We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.