droll

  • 1 Droll — (dr[=o]l), a. [Compar. {Droller}; superl. {Drollest}.] [F. dr[^o]le; cf. G. & D. drollig, LG. drullig, D. drol a thick and short person, a droll, Sw. troll a magical appearance, demon, trolla to use magic arts, enchant, Dan. trold elf, imp, Icel …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 droll — droll·ery; droll·ing·ly; droll·ness; droll; …

    English syllables

  • 3 Droll — Droll, v. t. 1. To lead or influence by jest or trick; to banter or jest; to cajole. [1913 Webster] Men that will not be reasoned into their senses, may yet be laughed or drolled into them. L Estrange. [1913 Webster] 2. To make a jest of; to set… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 Droll — Droll, n. 1. One whose practice it is to raise mirth by odd tricks; a jester; a buffoon; a merry andrew. Prior. [1913 Webster] 2. Something exhibited to raise mirth or sport, as a puppet, a farce, and the like. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5 Droll — Droll, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Drolled}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Drolling}.] To jest; to play the buffoon. [R.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6 droll — [drōl] adj. [Fr drôle, orig. n., buffoon, jester < MDu drol, short, stout fellow, lit., bowling pin] amusing in an odd or wry way n. Now Rare a droll person; jester vi. Now Rare to joke; play the jester SYN. FUNNY drollness n. drolly adv …

    English World dictionary

  • 7 droll — [drəul US droul] adj [Date: 1600 1700; : French; Origin: drôle] amusing in an unusual way …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 8 droll — [ droul ] adjective funny in an unusual way …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 9 droll — (adj.) 1620s, from Fr. drôle odd, comical, funny (1580s), in M.Fr. a noun meaning a merry fellow, possibly from M.Du. drol fat little fellow, goblin, or M.H.G. trolle clown, ultimately from O.N. troll giant, troll (see TROLL (Cf. troll) (n.)).… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 10 droll — *laughable, risible, comic, comical, funny, ludicrous, ridiculous, farcical Analogous words: amusing, diverting, entertaining (see AMUSE): absurd, preposterous (see FOOLISH): humorous, *witty, facetious …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 11 droll — [adj] amusing, farcical absurd, camp, campy, clownish, comic, comical, crack up, diverting, eccentric, entertaining, for grins*, funny, gagged up*, gelastic, humorous, jocular, joshing, laffer, laughable, ludicrous, odd, preposterous, quaint,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 12 droll — ► ADJECTIVE ▪ amusing in a strange or quaint way. DERIVATIVES drollery noun drollness noun drolly adverb. ORIGIN French, perhaps from Dutch drolle imp, goblin …

    English terms dictionary

  • 13 droll|er|y — «DROH luhr ee, DROHL ree», noun, plural er|ies. 1. something odd and amusing; a laughable trick. 2. quaint humor: »the rich drollery of “She Stoops to Conquer” (Macaulay). 3. a jesting; joking. 4. Obsolete. a comic play, farce, or puppet show …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 14 Droll — For the type of humor, see Droll humor. For video game, see Drol. For the musician, see Gibb Droll. Frontispiece to The Wits or Sport upon Sport (London, 1662). Attributed to Francis Kirkman. A droll is a short comical sketch of a type that… …

    Wikipedia

  • 15 droll — [[t]droʊl[/t]] adj. droll•er, droll•est, n. 1) amusing in an odd way; whimsically humorous; waggish 2) a droll person; jester; wag • Etymology: 1615–25; < MF drolle pleasant rascal < MD drol a fat little man droll′ness, n. drol′ly, adv. syn …

    From formal English to slang

  • 16 droll — drollness, n. drolly, adv. /drohl/, adj., droller, drollest, n., v. adj. 1. amusing in an odd way; whimsically humorous; waggish. n. 2. a droll person; jester; wag. v.i. 3. Archaic. to jest; joke. [1615 25; < MF drolle pleasant rascal < MD drol …

    Universalium

  • 17 droll — [[t]dro͟ʊl[/t]] ADJ GRADED Something or someone that is droll is amusing or witty, sometimes in an unexpected way. [WRITTEN] The band have a droll sense of humour …

    English dictionary

  • 18 droll — UK [drəʊl] / US [droʊl] adjective Word forms droll : adjective droll comparative droller superlative drollest funny in an unusual way …

    English dictionary

  • 19 droll — I. adjective Etymology: French drôle, from drôle scamp, from Middle French drolle, from Middle Dutch, imp Date: 1623 having a humorous, whimsical, or odd quality < his dignified presence decorated our droll little quarters Gwendolyn Brooks > •… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 20 droll — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) adj. comical, amusing. See amusement. II (Roget s IV) modif. Syn. funny, comical, laughable, whimsical; see funny 1 . See Synonym Study at funny . III (Roget s 3 Superthesaurus) (VOCABULARY WORD) a.… …

    English dictionary for students


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