collect+together

  • 1 collect together — index accumulate (amass) Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …

    Law dictionary

  • 2 collect together — phr verb Collect together is used with these nouns as the object: ↑belongings …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 3 Collect — • The name now used only for short prayers before the Epistle in the Mass, which occur again at Lauds, Terce, Sext, None, and Vespers Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Collect     Collect …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 4 collect — I (gather) verb accumulate, acquire, add to, aggregate, amalgamate, amass, assemble, bring to a common center, bring to a point of union, bring together, compile, concentrate, conferre, congerere, conglomerate, consolidate, convene, convocare,… …

    Law dictionary

  • 5 collect — collect1 [kə lekt′] vt. [ME collecten < OFr collecter < L collectus: see COLLECT2] 1. to gather together; assemble 2. to gather (stamps, books, etc.) as a hobby 3. to call for and receive (money) for (rent, a fund, taxes, bills, etc.) 4. to …

    English World dictionary

  • 6 collect — Ⅰ. collect [1] ► VERB 1) bring or gather together. 2) systematically acquire (items of a particular kind) as a hobby. 3) call for and take away; fetch. 4) call for and receive as a right or due. 5) (collect oneself) regain control of onese …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7 Collect — Col*lect (k[o^]l*l[e^]kt ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Collected}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Collecting}.] [L. collecrus, p. p. of collerige to bind together; col + legere to gather: cf. OF. collecter. See {Legend}, and cf. {Coil}, v. t., {Cull}, v. t.] 1. To… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8 collect — (v.) early 15c. (trans.), from O.Fr. collecter to collect (late 14c.), from L. collectus, pp. of colligere gather together, from com together (see COM (Cf. com )) + legere to gather (see LECTURE (Cf. lecture) (n.)). The intransitive sense is… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 9 collect — [v1] accumulate, come together aggregate, amass, array, assemble, cluster, compile, congregate, congress, convene, converge, convoke, corral, flock, flock together, gather, get hold of, group, heap, hoard, muster, rally, rendezvous, round up,… …

    New thesaurus

  • 10 Collect — Col*lect , v. i. 1. To assemble together; as, the people collected in a crowd; to accumulate; as, snow collects in banks. [1913 Webster] 2. To infer; to conclude. [Archaic] [1913 Webster] Whence some collect that the former word imports a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 collect — col|lect1 W2S1 [kəˈlekt] v ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(bring together)¦ 2¦(keep objects)¦ 3¦(rent/debts/taxes)¦ 4¦(money to help people)¦ 5¦(increase in amount)¦ 6¦(win something)¦ 7 collect yourself/collect your thoughts 8¦(take somebody/something from a place)¦ …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 collect — 1 verb 1 BRING TOGETHER (T) to get things of the same type from different places and bring them together: Researchers spent 6 months collecting facts and figures. | Could you collect some branches for a fire? 2 KEEP OBJECTS (T) to get and keep… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 collect — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) v. gather, collate, assemble, amass, compile; throng, congregate, flock; scrape or round up, garner, accumulate, save. See assemblage, acquisition. Ant., disperse, scatter. II (Roget s IV) v. 1. [To… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 14 collect — collect1 /keuh lekt /, v.t. 1. to gather together; assemble: The professor collected the students exams. 2. to accumulate; make a collection of: to collect stamps. 3. to receive or compel payment of: to collect a bill. 4. to regain control of… …

    Universalium

  • 15 collect — I. /kəˈlɛkt / (say kuh lekt) verb (t) 1. to gather together; assemble. 2. to accumulate; make a collection of. 3. to gather (money) for contributions or debts, for charity, etc. 4. to regain control of (one s thoughts, faculties, etc., or… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 16 together — to|geth|er1 W1S1 [təˈgeðə US ər] adv ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(with each other)¦ 2¦(make one thing)¦ 3¦(be a couple)¦ 4¦(in one place)¦ 5 close/packed/crowded etc together 6¦(against each other)¦ 7¦(in agreement)¦ 8¦(at the same time)¦ 9¦(combine amounts)¦ …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 17 together — to|geth|er1 [ tə geðər ] adverb *** ▸ 1 combined or joined ▸ 2 with each other ▸ 3 near each other ▸ 4 against each other ▸ 5 when people unite ▸ 6 at the same time ▸ 7 considered as whole ▸ 8 in a relationship ▸ + PHRASES 1. ) if you put two or… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 18 together — 1 adverb 1 MAKE ONE THING if you want to put two or more things together, you join them so that they form a single subject or group: Mix the butter and sugar together. | He added all the numbers together. | We stuck the pieces together again. |… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 19 together — I UK [təˈɡeðə(r)] / US [təˈɡeðər] adverb *** 1) a) if you put two or more things together, you combine them to form a single thing Now add the numbers together. together with: Mix the flour together with the milk. b) if you sew, stick, join etc… …

    English dictionary

  • 20 collect — I. noun Etymology: Middle English collecte, from Anglo French, from Medieval Latin collecta (short for oratio ad collectam prayer upon assembly), from Late Latin, assembly, from Latin, assemblage, from feminine of collectus Date: 13th century 1.… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary


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