Expel

  • 1 expel — ex‧pel [ɪkˈspel] verb expelled PTandPPX expelling PRESPARTX [transitive] to officially make someone leave a country or an organization: • In the past, the government found it legally difficult to identify and expel illegal immigrants. expel… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 Expel — Ex*pel , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Expelled}, p. pr. & vb. n.. {Expelling}.] [L. expellere, expulsum; ex out + pellere to drive: cf.F. expeller. See {Pulse} a beat.] 1. To drive or force out from that within which anything is contained, inclosed, or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 expel — I verb banish, cut out, deport, discard, discharge, dislodge, dismiss, disown, dispose of, dispossess, drive out, eicere, eject, eliminate, emit, evict, exclude, excommunicate, exigere, exile, expatriate, expellere, extrude, force away, force out …

    Law dictionary

  • 4 expel — [v1] discharge belch, blow out, cast out, disgorge, dislodge, drive out, ejaculate, eruct, erupt, evacuate, exhaust, exudate, exude, get rid of, irrupt, pass, remove, spew, throw out, vomit; concept 179 Ant. absorb, admit, take in expel [v2]… …

    New thesaurus

  • 5 expel — late 14c., from L. expellere drive out, from ex out (see EX (Cf. ex )) + pellere to drive (see PULSE (Cf. pulse) (1)). Meaning to eject from a school is first recorded 1640s. Related: Expelled; expelling …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 expel — *eject, oust, dismiss, evict Analogous words: *banish, exile, ostracize: *dismiss, discharge, cashier, fire: *discard, cast: *exclude, shut out, eliminate Antonyms: admit (sense 1) …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 7 expel — ► VERB (expelled, expelling) 1) force or drive out. 2) force (a pupil) to leave a school. DERIVATIVES expellable adjective expellee noun expeller noun. ORIGIN Latin expell …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 expel — [ek spel′, ikspel′] vt. expelled, expelling [ME expellen < L expellere < ex , out + pellere, to thrust: see PULSE1] 1. to drive out by force; force out; eject 2. to dismiss or send away by authority; deprive of rights, membership, etc. SYN …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 expel — UK [ɪkˈspel] / US verb [transitive] Word forms expel : present tense I/you/we/they expel he/she/it expels present participle expelling past tense expelled past participle expelled 1) to officially force someone to leave a place or organization… …

    English dictionary

  • 10 expel — ex|pel [ ık spel ] verb transitive 1. ) to officially force someone to leave a place or organization because of their bad behavior: They have no legal power to expel a party member. expel someone from something: The police were sent to expel the… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 11 expel — v. (D; tr.) to expel from (to expel a child from school) * * * [ɪk spel] (D; tr.) to expel from (to expel a child from school) …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 12 expel — ex|pel [ıkˈspel] v past tense and past participle expelled present participle expelling [T] [Date: 1300 1400; : Latin; Origin: expellere, from pellere to drive ] 1.) to officially force someone to leave a school or organization →↑expulsion expel… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 expel — expellable, adj. /ik spel /, v.t., expelled, expelling. 1. to drive or force out or away; discharge or eject: to expel air from the lungs; to expel an invader from a country. 2. to cut off from membership or relations: to expel a student from a… …

    Universalium

  • 14 expel — [[t]ɪkspe̱l[/t]] expels, expelling, expelled 1) VERB: usu passive If someone is expelled from a school or organization, they are officially told to leave because they have behaved badly. [be V ed] More than five thousand secondary school students …

    English dictionary

  • 15 expel — verb expelled, expelling (T) 1 to dismiss someone officially from a school or organization: expel sb from: I was expelled from school when I was fourteen. | expel sb for doing sth: Three party members were expelled for accepting bribes. | get… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 expel — /əkˈspɛl / (say uhk spel), /ɛk / (say ek ) verb (t) (expelled, expelling) 1. to drive or force out or away; discharge or eject: to expel air from the lungs; to expel an invader from a country. 2. to cut off from membership or relations: to expel… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 17 expel — verb ADVERB ▪ forcibly ▪ They were forcibly expelled from their farm by the occupying authorities. ▪ immediately ▪ permanently ▪ Any student may be permanently expelled for coming to school with a weapon …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 18 expel — 01. The principal has [expelled] three students for beating up another boy. 02. He has been suspended from school a number of times and is at risk of being [expelled]. 03. A full grown oak tree [expels] about seven tons of water through its… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 19 expel — ex•pel [[t]ɪkˈspɛl[/t]] v. t. pelled, pel•ling 1) to drive or force out or away; discharge; eject 2) to cut off from membership or relations: to expel a student from a college[/ex] • Etymology: 1350–1400; ME < L expellere to drive out, drive… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 20 expel — transitive verb (expelled; expelling) Etymology: Middle English expellen, from Latin expellere, from ex + pellere to drive more at felt Date: 14th century 1. to force out ; eject < expelled the smoke from her lungs > 2. to force to leave (as a… …

    New Collegiate Dictionary


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