Break++suddenly

  • 1 break — [brāk] vt. broke, broken, breaking [ME breken < OE brecan < IE base * bhreg > BREACH, BREECH, Ger brechen, L frangere] 1. to cause to come apart by force; split or crack sharply into pieces; smash; burst 2. a) …

    English World dictionary

  • 2 Break — (br[=a]k), v. i. 1. To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder. [1913 Webster] 2. To open spontaneously, or by pressure from within, as a bubble, a tumor, a seed vessel, a bag …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 3 break — ► VERB (past broke; past part. broken) 1) separate into pieces as a result of a blow, shock, or strain. 2) make or become inoperative; stop working. 3) interrupt (a continuity, sequence, or course). 4) fail to observe (a law, regulation, or… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4 break out — {v.} 1. To begin showing a rash or other skin disorder. Often used with with . * /He broke out with scarlet fever./ 2. To speak or act suddenly and violently. * /He broke out laughing./ * /She broke out, That is not so! / 3. To begin and become… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5 break out — {v.} 1. To begin showing a rash or other skin disorder. Often used with with . * /He broke out with scarlet fever./ 2. To speak or act suddenly and violently. * /He broke out laughing./ * /She broke out, That is not so! / 3. To begin and become… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6 Break — (br[=a]k), v. t. [imp. {broke} (br[=o]k), (Obs. {Brake}); p. p. {Broken} (br[=o] k n), (Obs. {Broke}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Breaking}.] [OE. breken, AS. brecan; akin to OS. brekan, D. breken, OHG. brehhan, G. brechen, Icel. braka to creak, Sw. braka …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7 break away from someone — break away (from (someone/something)) 1. to escape. George s excited horse broke away and ran off into the field. 2. to separate from the control of someone or something. Scotland isn t going to suddenly break away from the rest of Great Britain …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 8 break away from something — break away (from (someone/something)) 1. to escape. George s excited horse broke away and ran off into the field. 2. to separate from the control of someone or something. Scotland isn t going to suddenly break away from the rest of Great Britain …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 9 break away from — break away (from (someone/something)) 1. to escape. George s excited horse broke away and ran off into the field. 2. to separate from the control of someone or something. Scotland isn t going to suddenly break away from the rest of Great Britain …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 10 break away — (from (someone/something)) 1. to escape. George s excited horse broke away and ran off into the field. 2. to separate from the control of someone or something. Scotland isn t going to suddenly break away from the rest of Great Britain. We re… …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 11 break cover — Ⅰ. ► break cover (of game being hunted) emerge into the open. Main Entry: ↑break Ⅱ. ► break cover suddenly leave shelter when being pursued. Main Entry: ↑cover …

    English terms dictionary

  • 12 break into something — break into (something) 1. to begin suddenly to do something. Then he broke into a run and we just couldn t catch him. Onishi broke into sobs and covered his eyes with a handkerchief. 2. to enter a place by using force. His apartment has been… …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 13 break into — (something) 1. to begin suddenly to do something. Then he broke into a run and we just couldn t catch him. Onishi broke into sobs and covered his eyes with a handkerchief. 2. to enter a place by using force. His apartment has been broken into… …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 14 break open something — break open (something) to suddenly and clearly begin to win a competition. Several quick goals helped Hewlett break open a close game and beat the Tigers by 10 points …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 15 break open — (something) to suddenly and clearly begin to win a competition. Several quick goals helped Hewlett break open a close game and beat the Tigers by 10 points …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 16 break down — ► break down 1) suddenly cease to function or continue. 2) lose control of one s emotions when in distress. Main Entry: ↑break …

    English terms dictionary

  • 17 break out — ► break out 1) (of something undesirable) start suddenly. 2) escape. 3) informal open and start using (something). Main Entry: ↑break …

    English terms dictionary

  • 18 break out in — ► break out in be suddenly affected by an unpleasant sensation or condition. Main Entry: ↑break …

    English terms dictionary

  • 19 break forth — To burst out, issue • • • Main Entry: ↑break * * * burst out suddenly; emerge …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 20 break for something — ˈbreak for sth derived to suddenly run towards sth when you are trying to escape • She had to hold him back as he tried to break for the door. Main entry: ↑breakderived …

    Useful english dictionary


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