to tease out

  • 1 tease out something — tease out (something) to carefully separate particular facts from a great deal of information. What has always been interesting for me is how you can tease out the reasons for an event as you review its history. After a while, you learn how to… …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 2 tease out — (something) to carefully separate particular facts from a great deal of information. What has always been interesting for me is how you can tease out the reasons for an event as you review its history. After a while, you learn how to tease out… …

    New idioms dictionary

  • 3 tease out — phrasal verb [transitive] Word forms tease out : present tense I/you/we/they tease out he/she/it teases out present participle teasing out past tense teased out past participle teased out 1) to succeed in discovering something difficult,… …

    English dictionary

  • 4 tease out — PHRASAL VERB If you tease out information or a solution, you succeed in obtaining it even though this is difficult. [V P n (not pron)] They try to tease out the answers without appearing to ask... [V n P] There had to be an answer he was sure he… …

    English dictionary

  • 5 tease out — transitive verb Etymology: tease (I) : to obtain by disentangling or freeing with or as if with a pointed instrument isolated striated muscle fibers can be teased out from muscles Medical Physics delicately teasing out the embryos from a little… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 6 tease out — transitive verb Date: 1828 1. to obtain by or as if by disentangling or freeing with a pointed instrument 2. unravel 2 …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 7 tease out — verb a) To unravel. b) To separate as if by unraveling …

    Wiktionary

  • 8 tease — [tēz] vt. teased, teasing [ME tesen < OE tæsan, to pull about, pluck, tease, akin to Du teezen < IE * di s < base * dā(i) , to cut apart, divide > TIDE1] 1. a) to separate the fibers of; card or comb (flax, wool, etc.) b) to fluff… …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 tease — ► VERB 1) playfully make fun of or attempt to provoke. 2) tempt sexually. 3) (tease out) find out by searching through a mass of information. 4) gently pull or comb (tangled wool, hair, etc.) into separate strands. 5) archaic comb (the surface of …

    English terms dictionary

  • 10 tease — tease1 [ti:z] v ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(laugh)¦ 2¦(annoy an animal)¦ 3¦(sex)¦ 4¦(hair)¦ Phrasal verbs  tease something<=>out ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [: Old English; Origin: tAsan] 1.) ¦(LAUGH)¦ [I and T] to laugh at someone and make jokes in order to ha …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 11 tease — 1 verb 1 (I, T) to make jokes and laugh at someone in order to have fun by embarrassing them, either in a friendly way or in an unkind way: Don t get upset, I was only teasing. | tease sb: Kids often tease each other. | tease sb about: I was… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 12 tease — tease1 [ tiz ] verb * 1. ) intransitive or transitive to say something to someone in order to have fun by embarrassing or annoying them slightly in a friendly or unkind way: I didn t mean it: I was only teasing. tease someone about… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 13 tease — I UK [tiːz] / US [tɪz] verb Word forms tease : present tense I/you/we/they tease he/she/it teases present participle teasing past tense teased past participle teased * 1) a) [intransitive/transitive] to say something to someone in order to have… …

    English dictionary

  • 14 tease — [[t]ti͟ːz[/t]] teases, teasing, teased 1) VERB To tease someone means to laugh at them or make jokes about them in order to embarrass, annoy, or upset them. [V n] He told her how the boys in East Poldown had set on him, teasing him... [V n about… …

    English dictionary

  • 15 tease — [c]/tiz / (say teez) verb (teased, teasing) –verb (t) 1. to worry or irritate by persistent petty requests, trifling raillery, or other annoyances often in jest. 2. to pull apart or separate the adhering fibres of, as in combing or carding wool;… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 16 tease — [OE] Tease originally meant ‘separate the fibres of wool’ (a sense still perceptible in the metaphorical tease out ‘disentangle something complicated’). It came from a prehistoric West Germanic *taisjan, whose base was also the source of English… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 17 tease — [OE] Tease originally meant ‘separate the fibres of wool’ (a sense still perceptible in the metaphorical tease out ‘disentangle something complicated’). It came from a prehistoric West Germanic *taisjan, whose base was also the source of English… …

    Word origins

  • 18 tease — v. & n. v.tr. (also absol.) 1 a make fun of (a person or animal) playfully or unkindly or annoyingly. b tempt or allure, esp. sexually, while refusing to satisfy the desire aroused. 2 pick (wool, hair, etc.) into separate fibres. 3 dress (cloth)… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 19 out-talent — to out tease: see out …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 20 tease — 01. The children [teased] the boy because of his stutter. 02. Don t [tease] your little sister about her new haircut; you ll only make her cry. 03. The boys [teased] the young girl about her developing breasts until she punched one kid in the… …

    Grammatical examples in English