sudden+gust

  • 1gust — gust1 [gʌst] n [Date: 1500 1600; : Old Norse; Origin: gustr] 1.) a sudden strong movement of wind, air, rain etc gust of ▪ A sudden gust of wind blew the door shut. ▪ Gusts of up to 200 kph may be experienced. 2.) gust of laughter a sound of loud …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 2gust — 1 noun (C) 1 a sudden strong movement of wind: A sudden gust of wind blew the door shut. 2 a sudden strong feeling of anger, excitement etc: A gust of rage swept through him. 2 verb (I) if the wind gusts, it blows strongly with sudden short… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 3gust — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} noun ADJECTIVE ▪ great ▪ little, small ▪ huge, powerful, strong ▪ sudden …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 4gust — 1. noun 1) a sudden gust of wind Syn: flurry, blast, puff, blow, rush; squall 2) gusts of laughter Syn: outburst, burst, eruption, fit, paroxysm; gale …

    Thesaurus of popular words

  • 5Gust — (g[u^]st), n. [Icel. gustr a cool breeze. Cf. {Gush}.] 1. A sudden squall; a violent blast of wind; a sudden and brief rushing or driving of the wind. [1913 Webster] Snow, and hail, stormy gust and flaw. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. A sudden violent …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6gust — gust1 [gust] n. [ON gustr, gust, blast < gjosa, to gush, break out < IE * gheus < base * ĝheu , to pour > GUT, L fundere] 1. a sudden, strong rush of air or wind 2. a sudden burst of rain, smoke, fire, sound, etc. 3. an outburst of… …

    English World dictionary

  • 7gust of wind — sudden rush of wind …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 8gust — gust1 gustless, adj. /gust/, n. 1. a sudden, strong blast of wind. 2. a sudden rush or burst of water, fire, smoke, sound, etc. 3. an outburst of passionate feeling. v.i. 4. to blow or rush in gusts. [1580 90; < ON gustr a gust, akin to gjosa,&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 9gust — I [[t]gʌst[/t]] n. v. gust•ed, gust•ing. n. 1) a sudden strong blast of wind 2) a sudden rush or burst, as of water or fire 3) an outburst of passionate feeling 4) to blow or rush in gusts • Etymology: 1580–90; &LT; ON gustr a gust, akin to gjōsa …

    From formal English to slang

  • 10gust — [[t]gʌ̱st[/t]] gusts, gusting, gusted 1) N COUNT: oft N of n A gust is a short, strong, sudden rush of wind. A gust of wind drove down the valley... A hurricane force gust blew off part of a church tower. 2) VERB When the wind gusts, it blows&#8230; …

    English dictionary

  • 11gust´a|ble — gust1 «guhst», noun, verb. –n. 1. a sudden, violent rush of wind: »A gust upset the small sailboat. SYNONYM(S): squall. 2. a sudden burst of rain, smoke, or sound, usually carried by the wind. 3. Figurative. an outburst of anger or other feeling …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 12gust — I UK [ɡʌst] / US noun [countable] Word forms gust : singular gust plural gusts 1) a sudden strong wind 2) a sudden strong feeling or expression of emotion II UK [ɡʌst] / US verb [intransitive] Word forms gust : present tense I/you/we/they gust&#8230; …

    English dictionary

  • 13gust — gust1 [ gʌst ] noun count 1. ) a sudden strong wind 2. ) a sudden strong feeling or expression of emotion gust gust 2 [ gʌst ] verb intransitive if a wind gusts, it blows very strongly for short periods of time …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 14gust — /gʌst / (say gust) noun 1. a sudden, strong blast of wind. 2. a sudden rush or burst of water, fire, smoke, sound, etc. 3. an outburst of passionate feeling. –verb (i) 4. to blow in gusts: the wind gusted to 50 knots. {16th century; ? from Old&#8230; …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 15gust — I. noun Etymology: Middle English guste, from Latin gustus; akin to Latin gustare to taste more at choose Date: 15th century 1. obsolete a. the sensation of taste b. inclination, liking 2. keen delight II …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16gust — [16] The underlying meaning of gust is ‘sudden rush or gush’, and related words refer to water or steam rather than wind. It was borrowed from Old Norse gustr ‘gust’, and the closely connected geysa ‘gush’ produced English geyser [18]. =&GT;&#8230; …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 17gust — [16] The underlying meaning of gust is ‘sudden rush or gush’, and related words refer to water or steam rather than wind. It was borrowed from Old Norse gustr ‘gust’, and the closely connected geysa ‘gush’ produced English geyser [18]. Cf.⇒&#8230; …

    Word origins

  • 18gust — gÊŒst n. strong and sudden wind; burst or gush (of water, wind, etc.); emotional outburst v. blow suddenly or strongly (as a gust of wind) …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 19gust — [gʌst] noun [C] I a sudden strong wind gusty adj II verb [I] gust [gʌst] if a wind gusts, it blows very strongly for short periods of time …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 20sudden — adj. Sudden is used with these nouns: ↑acceleration, ↑alarm, ↑anger, ↑appearance, ↑arrival, ↑attack, ↑awakening, ↑awareness, ↑bout, ↑breeze, ↑burst, ↑change …

    Collocations dictionary