subjunctive mood

  • 21 subjunctive — I. adjective Etymology: Late Latin subjunctivus, from Latin subjunctus, past participle of subjungere to join beneath, subordinate Date: 1530 of, relating to, or constituting a verb form or set of verb forms that represents a denoted act or state …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 22 mood — mood1 noun 1》 a state of mind or feeling.     ↘an angry, irritable, or sullen state of mind. 2》 the atmosphere or pervading tone of something. 3》 [as modifier] inducing or suggestive of a particular mood: mood music. Origin OE mōd, of Gmc origin …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 23 subjunctive — adj. & n. Gram. adj. (of a mood) denoting what is imagined or wished or possible (e.g. if I were you, God help you, be that as it may). n. 1 the subjunctive mood. 2 a verb in this mood. Derivatives: subjunctively adv. Etymology: F subjonctif ive… …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 24 subjunctive — 1. adjective inflected to indicate that an act or state of being is possible, contingent or hypothetical, and not a fact. English examples include so be it; I wouldn’t if I were you; were I a younger man, I would fight back; I asked that he leave …

    Wiktionary

  • 25 subjunctive — sub·junc·tive || sÉ™b dʒʌŋktɪv n. subjunctive mood, verb in the subjunctive mood (Grammar) adj. of or pertaining to a verb form which expresses an action or state as something which is not yet fact and is still contingent and dependent… …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 26 mood — 1. n. 1 a state of mind or feeling. 2 (in pl.) fits of melancholy or bad temper. 3 (attrib.) inducing a particular mood (mood music). Phrases and idioms: in the (or no) mood (foll. by for, or to + infin.) inclined (or disinclined) (was in no mood …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 27 subjunctive — [[t]səbʤʌ̱ŋktɪv[/t]] N SING: the N In English, a clause expressing a wish or suggestion can be put in the subjunctive, or in the subjunctive mood, by using the base form of a verb or were . Examples are He asked that they be removed and I wish I… …

    English dictionary

  • 28 subjunctive equivalent — noun : a verb phrase formed in English with a modal auxiliary (as shall, should, may, might) and functioning in a manner comparable to the subjunctive mood …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 29 mood — W3S3 [mu:d] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(way you feel)¦ 2 be in a mood 3 be/feel in the mood for something 4 be in no mood for something/to do something 5¦(way a place or event feels)¦ 6¦(grammar)¦ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [Sense: 1 5; Origin: Old English mod mind, courage ] …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 30 mood — noun 1 WAY YOU FEEL (C) the way you feel at a particular time: His moods change very quickly one moment he s cheerful and the next he s sunk in despair. | It takes a couple of days to get into the holiday mood. | be in a good mood/bad mood etc… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 31 mood — I (New American Roget s College Thesaurus) n. temper, humor, disposition, inclination. See tendency, feeling. II (Roget s IV) n. 1. [A state of mind] Syn. frame of mind, state, condition, temper, humor, temperament, spirits, disposition,… …

    English dictionary for students

  • 32 mood — I [[t]mud[/t]] n. 1) a person s emotional state or outlook at a particular time 2) a distinctive emotional quality or character: a festive mood[/ex] 3) a prevailing emotional tone or general attitude: the country s mood[/ex] 4) a frame of mind… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 33 mood — I. /mud / (say moohd) noun 1. a frame of mind, or state of feeling, as at a particular time. 2. (plural) fits of uncertainty, gloominess, or sullenness. 3. the collective attitude: to harness the mood for change; the mood of the meeting. –phrase… …

    Australian English dictionary

  • 34 mood — English has two words mood. The original one, ‘emotional state’ [OE], goes back to a prehistoric Germanic *mōthaz or *mōtham, whose descendants have denoted a wide range of such states: ‘anger’, for instance (Old Norse móthr), and ‘courage’… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 35 mood — English has two words mood. The original one, ‘emotional state’ [OE], goes back to a prehistoric Germanic *mōthaz or *mōtham, whose descendants have denoted a wide range of such states: ‘anger’, for instance (Old Norse móthr), and ‘courage’… …

    Word origins

  • 36 mood — 1 In the theory of the syllogism the valid forms with each figure are called the moods of that figure. 2 In the philosophy of language the mood of a sentence (indicative, imperative, subjunctive, etc.) is a feature whose best representation is… …

    Philosophy dictionary

  • 37 mood — Synonyms and related words: Aristotelian sorites, Goclenian sorites, action, affection, air, anagnorisis, angle, architectonics, architecture, argument, atmosphere, attitude, aura, background, catastrophe, categorical syllogism, character,… …

    Moby Thesaurus

  • 38 mood —  erbs have four moods:  . The indicative, which is used to state facts or ask questions (I am going; What time is it?).  . The imperative, which indicates commands (Come here; Leave me alone).  . The infinite, which makes general statements and… …

    Bryson’s dictionary for writers and editors

  • 39 subjunctive —   a.,n. Grammar, (pertaining to) mood of verb expressing possibility, desire, etc., and not actuality or fact …

    Dictionary of difficult words

  • 40 Grammatical mood — Grammatical categories Animacy Aspect Case Clusivity Definiteness Degree of comparison Evidentiality Focus …

    Wikipedia


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