sapid speech

  • 1maiden speech — {n. phr.} One s first public speech, usually before some legislative body. * /It was the new congressman s maiden speech and everyone was listening very keenly./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2maiden speech — {n. phr.} One s first public speech, usually before some legislative body. * /It was the new congressman s maiden speech and everyone was listening very keenly./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3By-speech — n. An incidental or casual speech, not directly relating to the point. To quote by speeches. Hooker. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4figure of speech — Figure Fig ure (f[i^]g [ u]r; 135), n. [F., figure, L. figura; akin to fingere to form, shape, feign. See {Feign}.] 1. The form of anything; shape; outline; appearance. [1913 Webster] Flowers have all exquisite figures. Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 5Folk speech — Folk Folk (f[=o]k), Folks Folks (f[=o]ks), n. collect. & pl. [AS. folc; akin to D. volk, OS. & OHG. folk, G. volk, Icel. f[=o]lk, Sw. & Dan. folk, Lith. pulkas crowd, and perh. to E. follow.] 1. (Eng. Hist.) In Anglo Saxon times, the people of a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6Impediment in speech — Impediment Im*ped i*ment, n. [L. impedimentum: cf. F. impediment.] That which impedes or hinders progress, motion, activity, or effect. [1913 Webster] Thus far into the bowels of the land Have we marched on without impediment. Shak. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7Maiden speech — Maiden Maid en, a. 1. Of or pertaining to a maiden, or to maidens; suitable to, or characteristic of, a virgin; as, maiden innocence. Amid the maiden throng. Addison. [1913 Webster] Have you no modesty, no maiden shame ? Shak. [1913 Webster] 2.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8Oblique speech — Oblique Ob*lique , a. [F., fr. L. obliquus; ob (see {Ob }) + liquis oblique; cf. licinus bent upward, Gr. le chrios slanting.] [Written also {oblike}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Not erect or perpendicular; neither parallel to, nor at right angles from,… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9Part of speech — Part Part (p[aum]rt), n. [F. part, L. pars, gen. partis; cf. parere to bring forth, produce. Cf. {Parent}, {Depart}, {Parcel}, {Partner}, {Party}, {Portion}.] 1. One of the portions, equal or unequal, into which anything is divided, or regarded… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10Sapid — Sap id, a. [L. sapidus, fr. sapere to taste: cf. F. sapide. See {Sapient}, {Savor}.] Having the power of affecting the organs of taste; possessing savor, or flavor. [1913 Webster] Camels, to make the water sapid, do raise the mud with their feet …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11Set speech — Set Set (s[e^]t), a. 1. Fixed in position; immovable; rigid; as, a set line; a set countenance. [1913 Webster] 2. Firm; unchanging; obstinate; as, set opinions or prejudices. [1913 Webster] 3. Regular; uniform; formal; as, a set discourse; a set… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12Speech — Speech, v. i. & t. To make a speech; to harangue. [R.] [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13Speech — Speech, n. [OE. speche, AS. sp?c, spr?, fr. specan, sprecan, to speak; akin to D. spraak speech, OHG. spr[=a]hha, G. sprache, Sw. spr?k, Dan. sprog. See {Speak}.] 1. The faculty of uttering articulate sounds or words; the faculty of expressing… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14Visible speech — Vis i*ble speech (Phon.) A system of characters invented by Prof. Alexander Melville Bell to represent all sounds that may be uttered by the speech organs, and intended to be suggestive of the position of the organs of speech in uttering them.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15free speech — noun Date: 1781 speech that is protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution; also the right to such speech < an unconstitutional restraint on free speech National Law Journal > …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 16visible speech — noun Date: 1865 1. a set of phonetic symbols based on symbols for articulatory position 2. speech reproduced spectrographically …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 17Hate speech — is a term for speech intended to degrade, intimidate, or incite violence or prejudicial action against a person or group of people based on their race, gender, age, ethnicity, nationality, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability …

    Wikipedia

  • 18Speech processing — is the study of speech signals and the processing methods of these signals. The signals are usually processed in a digital representation whereby speech processing can be seen as the intersection of digital signal processing and natural language&#8230; …

    Wikipedia

  • 19Speech coding — is the application of data compression of digital audio signals containing speech. Speech coding uses speech specific parameter estimation using audio signal processing techniques to model the speech signal, combined with generic data compression …

    Wikipedia

  • 20Speech recognition — For the human linguistic concept, see Speech perception. The display of the Speech Recognition screensaver on a PC, in which the character responds to questions, e.g. Where are you? or statements, e.g. Hello. Speech recognition (also known as&#8230; …

    Wikipedia