protectionist barriers

  • 1barriers to entry — Restrictions on the entry of new competitors into a *market. Barriers to entry may result from technical and economic factors. For example, the large scale investment in machinery needed for some production processes may be beyond the economic… …

    Auditor's dictionary

  • 2Non-tariff barriers to trade — (NTBs) are trade barriers that restrict imports but are not in the usual form of a tariff. Some common examples of NTB s are anti dumping measures and countervailing duties, which, although they are called non tariff barriers, have the effect of… …

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  • 3Miracle of Chile — Chilean (blue) and average Latin American (orange) GDP per capita (1950 2007). The Miracle of Chile was a term used by free market Nobel Prize winning economist Milton Friedman to describe liberal and free market reorientation of the economy of… …

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  • 4Economic History of the Netherlands (1500 - 1815) — The Economic History of the Netherlands (1500 1815), is the history of an economy that some consider to be the first modern economy, continuously existing to this day. It covers the period from the time in which the geographic area currently… …

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  • 5Argentina — For alternative meanings, see Argentina (disambiguation) and Argentine (disambiguation). Argentine Republic[1] …

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  • 6Price scissors — The price scissors is an economic phenomenon when for a certain group or sector of productive population the overall valuation from their production for sale outside this group drops below the valuation of the demand of this group for goods… …

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  • 7Trade creation — is an economic term related to international economics in which trade is created by the formation of a customs union. Occurrence of Trade Creation When a customs union is formed, the member nations establish a free trade zone amongst themselves… …

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  • 8Federalism in the United States — Refimprove|date=June 2007 Federalism in the United States is the evolving relationship between U.S. state governments and the federal government of the United States. Since the founding of the country, and particularly with the end of the… …

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  • 9Concordancia (Argentina) — Concordance Concordancia Leader Agustín Justo (political) Leopoldo Melo (ideological) Founded 1931 Headquarters Buenos Aires …

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  • 10Tariff of 1883 — In United States tax law history, the Tariff of 1883 (signed into law on March 3rd, 1883[1]), also known as the Mongrel Tariff Act by its critics, reduced high tariff rates only marginally, and left in place fairly strong protectionist barriers.… …

    Wikipedia

  • 11globalisation —    An umbrella term describing the way in which the constraints of geography are receding, so that cultural, economic, environmental and political issues are no longer decided within national boundaries but have become matters of global concern.… …

    Glossary of UK Government and Politics

  • 12multinational enterprise — MNE A corporation that has production operations in more than one country for various reasons, including securing supplies of raw materials, utilizing cheap labour sources, servicing local markets taking advantage of tax differences, and… …

    Accounting dictionary

  • 13multinational enterprise — MNE A corporation that has production operations in more than one country for various reasons, including securing supplies of raw materials, utilizing cheap labour sources, servicing local markets taking advantage of tax differences, and… …

    Big dictionary of business and management

  • 14protectionism — protectionist, n., adj. protectionistic, adj. /preuh tek sheuh niz euhm/, n. 1. Econ. the theory, practice, or system of fostering or developing domestic industries by protecting them from foreign competition through duties or quotas imposed on… …

    Universalium

  • 15fortress europe —  Protectionist policies of European countries (World War II).  ► “U.S. companies worried about the barriers brought on by ‘Fortress Europe’ now face another barrier to trade extending credit without getting burned. Until recently, most business… …

    American business jargon

  • 16international trade — Introduction       economic transactions that are made between countries. Among the items commonly traded are consumer goods, such as television sets and clothing; capital goods, such as machinery; and raw materials and food. Other transactions… …

    Universalium

  • 17Free trade — Not to be confused with Free market. World trade A series on Trade …

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  • 18Economic Affairs — ▪ 2006 Introduction In 2005 rising U.S. deficits, tight monetary policies, and higher oil prices triggered by hurricane damage in the Gulf of Mexico were moderating influences on the world economy and on U.S. stock markets, but some other… …

    Universalium

  • 19Protectionism — For the protectionist Australian political party from the 1880s to 1909, see Protectionist Party Protectionism is the economic policy of restraining trade between nations, through methods such as tariffs on imported goods, restrictive quotas, and …

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  • 20Trade — This article is about the economic mechanism. For other uses, see Trade (disambiguation). Purchase redirects here. For other uses, see Purchase (disambiguation) Trader in Germany, 16th century …

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