pignoris dig

  • 1 dig down — {v.}, {slang} To spend your own money. * /The school let the club use the bus and driver free for their trip, but they had to dig down to pay for gas and meals./ * / So you broke Mrs. Brown s window? Tom s father said, You ll have to dig down and …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2 dig in — {v.}, {informal} 1. To dig ditches for protection against an enemy attack. * /The soldiers dug in and waited for the enemy to come./ 2a. To go seriously to work; work hard. * /John dug in and finished his homework very quickly./ 2b. To begin… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3 dig out — {v.} 1. To find by searching; bring out (something) that was put away. * /Jack dug his sled out of the cellar./ * /The newspaper printed an old story dug out of their records./ Compare: DIG UP. 2. {informal} To escape. Usually used with of .… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4 dig up — {v.}, {informal} To find or get (something) with some effort. * /Sue dug up some useful material for her English composition./ * /Jim asked each boy to dig up twenty five cents to pay for the hot dogs and soda./ Compare: DIG OUT …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5 dig down — {v.}, {slang} To spend your own money. * /The school let the club use the bus and driver free for their trip, but they had to dig down to pay for gas and meals./ * / So you broke Mrs. Brown s window? Tom s father said, You ll have to dig down and …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6 dig in — {v.}, {informal} 1. To dig ditches for protection against an enemy attack. * /The soldiers dug in and waited for the enemy to come./ 2a. To go seriously to work; work hard. * /John dug in and finished his homework very quickly./ 2b. To begin… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 7 dig out — {v.} 1. To find by searching; bring out (something) that was put away. * /Jack dug his sled out of the cellar./ * /The newspaper printed an old story dug out of their records./ Compare: DIG UP. 2. {informal} To escape. Usually used with of .… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 8 dig up — {v.}, {informal} To find or get (something) with some effort. * /Sue dug up some useful material for her English composition./ * /Jim asked each boy to dig up twenty five cents to pay for the hot dogs and soda./ Compare: DIG OUT …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 9 dig — (d[i^]g), v. t. 1. To understand; as, do you dig me?. [slang] [PJC] 2. To notice; to look at; as, dig that crazy hat!. [slang] [PJC] 3. To appreciate and enjoy; as, he digs classical music as well as rock. [slang] [PJC] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 10 Dig — Dig, n. 1. A thrust; a punch; a poke; as, a dig in the side or the ribs. See {Dig}, v. t., 4. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster] 2. A plodding and laborious student. [Cant, U.S.] [1913 Webster] 3. A tool for digging. [Dial. Eng.] [Webster 1913 Suppl.] 4.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 11 Dig — (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to E. 1st… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 12 Dig — Dig, v. i. 1. To work with a spade or other like implement; to do servile work; to delve. [1913 Webster] Dig for it more than for hid treasures. Job iii. 21. [1913 Webster] I can not dig; to beg I am ashamed. Luke xvi. 3. [1913 Webster] 2.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 13 To dig down — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 14 To dig from — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 15 To dig in — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 16 to dig in one's heels — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 To dig out — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 To dig out — Dig Dig, v. i. 1. To work with a spade or other like implement; to do servile work; to delve. [1913 Webster] Dig for it more than for hid treasures. Job iii. 21. [1913 Webster] I can not dig; to beg I am ashamed. Luke xvi. 3. [1913 Webster] 2.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 To dig out of — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 To dig up — Dig Dig (d[i^]g), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Dug} (d[u^]g) or {Digged} (d[i^]gd); p. pr. & vb. n. {Digging}. Digged is archaic.] [OE. diggen, perh. the same word as diken, dichen (see {Dike}, {Ditch}); cf. Dan. dige to dig, dige a ditch; or (?) akin to …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English


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