participational show

  • 1get the show on the road — {v. phr.}, {informal} To start a program; get work started. * /It was several years before the rocket scientists got the show on the road./ Compare: GET THE BALL ROLLING …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2give the show away — {v. phr.} To reveal a plan or information that is supposed to be secret. * /You have read further in the book than I have, but please don t tell me where the treasure was buried; otherwise you d be giving the show away./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3good show! — {adj. phr.} Excellent; terrific; wonderful. * / Good show, boys! the coach cried, when our team won the game./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4go to show — or[go to prove] {v. phr.}, {informal} To seem to prove; act or serve to show (a fact); demonstrate. Often used after it . * /Our team beat a bigger team, and it just goes to show you can win if you play hard enough./ * /The hard winter at Valley… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5no-show — {n.}, {informal} A person who makes a reservation, e.g., at a hotel or at an airline, and then neither claims nor cancels it. * /The airlines were messed up because of a great number of no show passengers. / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6road show — {n.} A theatrical play that is performed for a few days in one town and then moves to other towns. * /Many actors get their start in road shows./ * /The road show is often not as good as the original play on Broadway./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 7show — See: GET THE SHOW ON THE ROAD, GO TO SHOW or GO TO PROVE, ROAD SHOW, STEAL THE SHOW, TALENT SHOW, VARIETY SHOW, WHOLE CHEESE or WHOLE SHOW …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 8show around — {v. phr.} To act as a host or guide to someone; to show newly arrived people or strangers what s what and where. * /When Gordon and Rose arrived in Hawaii for the first time, their host showed them around the islands./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 9show cause — {v. phr.} To give a reason or explanation. * /The judge asked the defendants to show cause why they should not be held without bail./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 10show in — or[out] or[up] or[to the door] {v. phr.} To usher; conduct; accompany. * / My husband will show you in, Mary said to the guests when they arrived at the door./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11show off — {v. phr.} 1. To put out nicely for people to see; display; exhibit. * /The Science Fair gave Julia a chance to show off her shell collection./ * /The girls couldn t wait to show off their fine needlework to our visitors./ 2. {informal} To try to… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12show of hands — {n. phr.} An open vote during a meeting when those who vote yes and those who vote no hold up their hands to be counted. * /The chairman said, I d like to see a show of hands if we re ready for the vote. / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13show one's colors — {v. phr.} 1. To show what you are really like. * /We thought Toby was timid, but he showed his colors when he rescued the ponies from the burning barn./ 2. To make known what you think or plan to do. * /Mr. Ryder is afraid that he will lose the… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14show one's face — {v. phr.} To be seen; appear. * /Bill is afraid to show his face since Tom threatened to beat him up./ * /Judy is a wonderful mimic but she is too shy to show her face on stage./ * /After cheating on the test, Chris was ashamed to show his face./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15show one's hand — {v. phr.} To reveal or exhibit one s true and hitherto hidden purpose. * /Only after becoming Chancellor of Germany did Adolf Hitler really show his hand and reveal that he intended to take over other countries./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16show one's teeth — {v. phr.} To show anger; show belligerence. * /He is a very mild, private person, but during a tough business negotiation he knows how to show his teeth./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17show up — {v.} 1. To make known the real truth about (someone). * /The man said he was a mind reader, but he was shown up as a fake./ 2. To come or bring out; become or make easy to see. * /The detective put a chemical on the paper, and the fingertips… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 18steal the show — {v. phr.} To act or do so well in a performance that you get most of the attention and the other performers are unnoticed. * /Mary was in only one scene of the play, but she stole the show from the stars./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19stop the show — {v. phr.} To elicit such a strong applause from the audience that the show is interrupted. * /Pavarotti s rendition of O sole mio always stops the show./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20talent show — {n.} An entertainment in which new entertainers try to win a prize. * /Mary won the talent show by her dancing./ * /The people liked Bill s singing in the talent show./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms