favour

  • 1favour — (US favor) ► NOUN 1) approval or liking. 2) an act of kindness beyond what is due or usual. 3) overgenerous preferential treatment. 4) (one s favours) dated a woman s consent to a man having sexual intercourse with her. 5) archaic a thing such as …

    English terms dictionary

  • 2Favour — Favour, Favor, Favours, or Favors may refer to:* Party favor, a small gift given to the guests at a party * Wedding favors, small gifts given as a gesture of appreciation to guests from the bride and groom during a weddingPeople with the surname… …

    Wikipedia

  • 3favour — British English spelling of FAVOR (Cf. favor) (q.v.); for spelling, see OR (Cf. or). Related: Favourite; favouritism …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 4favour — (Brit.) fa·vour || feɪvÉ™(r) n. kindness; approval; bias, prejudice; preferential treatment; small gift; ribbon, badge of loyalty (also favor) …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 5favour — favour, favourable, favourite are the normal BrE spellings, as distinct from favor, favorable, favorite in AmE …

    Modern English usage

  • 6favour — [fā′vər] n., vt. Brit. sp. of FAVOR …

    English World dictionary

  • 7favour — {{Roman}}I.{{/Roman}} (BrE) (AmE favor) noun 1 sth that helps sb ADJECTIVE ▪ big, great, huge ▪ little, small ▪ special …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 8favour — fa|vour1 W2S1 BrE favor AmE [ˈfeıvə US ər] n ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(help)¦ 2¦(support/approval)¦ 3¦(popular/unpopular)¦ 4¦(advantage)¦ 5¦(choose something instead)¦ 6 do somebody/something no favours 7¦(unfair support)¦ …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 9favour — 1 BrE, favor AmE noun 1 HELP (C) something that you do for someone in order to help them or be kind to them : ask a favour (of sb): Can I ask a favor of you? | do sb a favour: Could you do me a favour and turn off that light? | do sth as a favour …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10favour — I UK [ˈfeɪvə(r)] / US [ˈfeɪvər] noun Word forms favour : singular favour plural favours *** 1) [countable] something that you do for someone in order to help them do someone a favour: Could you do me a favour? ask a favour of someone: Can I ask a …

    English dictionary

  • 11favour — [[t]fe͟ɪvə(r)[/t]] ♦♦ favours, favouring, favoured (in AM, use favor) 1) N UNCOUNT If you regard something or someone with favour, you like or support them. It remains to be seen if the show will still find favour with a 1990s audience... No one… …

    English dictionary

  • 12favour*/*/ — [ˈfeɪvə] noun I 1) [C] something that you do for someone in order to help them Could you do me a favour?[/ex] He wouldn t take any money for his work: he insisted he was doing it as a favour.[/ex] 2) [U] support or admiration from people Nuclear… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 13favour — n. & v. (US favor) n. 1 an act of kindness beyond what is due or usual (did it as a favour). 2 esteem, liking, approval, goodwill; friendly regard (gained their favour; look with favour on). 3 partiality; too lenient or generous treatment. 4 aid …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 14favour — /ˈfeɪvə / (say fayvuh) noun 1. a kind act; something done or granted out of goodwill, rather than from justice or for remuneration: ask a favour. 2. kindness; kind approval. 3. a state of being approved, or held in regard: in favour; out of… …

    Australian-English dictionary

  • 15favour — (US favor) noun 1》 approval or liking.     ↘unfair preferential treatment.     ↘archaic a thing such as a badge that is given or worn as a mark of favour or support. 2》 an act of kindness beyond what is due or usual.     ↘(one s favours) dated a… …

    English new terms dictionary

  • 16favour — 1. noun 1) will you do me a favour? Syn: good turn, service, good deed, act of kindness, courtesy 2) she looked on him with favour Syn: approval, approbation, goodwill, kindness, benevolence …

    Synonyms and antonyms dictionary

  • 17favour — 1. noun /ˈfeɪvə(ɹ)/ A piece of help, usually to be repaid I need a favour. Could you lend me 5 dollars til tomorrow, please? 2. verb /ˈfeɪvə(ɹ)/ a) To look upon fondly; to prefer …

    Wiktionary

  • 18favour — [14] Latin favēre meant ‘regard favourably, side with protect’. It came ultimately from Indo European *dhegh , *dhogh ‘burn’, which also produced Latin fovēre ‘heat, cherish’ (source of English foment [15]) and English day. From it was derived… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 19favour —    to copulate with    A form of Dr Johnson s regarding with kindness, I suppose, without some of the overtones of favours:     He thanks our transport lady whom Mr Muspole claims to have favoured in the snooker room, (le Carré, 1986 he did not… …

    How not to say what you mean: A dictionary of euphemisms

  • 20favour — [14] Latin favēre meant ‘regard favourably, side with protect’. It came ultimately from Indo European *dhegh , *dhogh ‘burn’, which also produced Latin fovēre ‘heat, cherish’ (source of English foment [15]) and English day. From it was derived… …

    Word origins