fantastically

  • 1Fantastically — Fan*tas tic*al*ly, adv. In a fantastic manner. [1913 Webster] the letter A, in scarlet, fantastically embroidered with gold thread, upon her bosom. Hawthorne. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2fantastically — fan|tas|ti|cal|ly [ fæn tæstıkli ] adverb 1. ) extremely: She married a fantastically rich man. The economy s doing fantastically well. 2. ) very well: Both of them played fantastically yesterday. 3. ) in an unusual or strange way: The… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 3fantastically — UK [fænˈtæstɪklɪ] / US adverb 1) extremely She married a fantastically rich man. The economy s doing fantastically well. 2) very well Both of them played fantastically yesterday. 3) in an unusual or strange way The fantastically named band have… …

    English dictionary

  • 4fantastically — adverb a) In a fantastic manner. He painted fantastically with everything as if in a dream. b) To an extent only in fantasy. He was fantastically wealthy …

    Wiktionary

  • 5fantastically — adverb Date: 1543 1. in a fantastic manner 2. to a fantastic degree ; extremely < fantastically expensive clothes > …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 6fantastically — fantastic ► ADJECTIVE 1) imaginative or fanciful; remote from reality. 2) informal extraordinarily good or attractive. DERIVATIVES fantastical adjective fantastically adverb …

    English terms dictionary

  • 7fantastically — See fantasticality. * * * …

    Universalium

  • 8fantastically — adv. in a fantastic manner, fabulously; in an imaginary manner; oddly, strangely …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 9fantastically — fan·tas·ti·cal·ly …

    English syllables

  • 10fantastically — adverb exceedingly; extremely she plays fabulously well • Syn: ↑fabulously, ↑incredibly …

    Useful english dictionary

  • 11fantastic — fantastically, adv. fantasticalness, fantasticality, n. /fan tas tik/, adj. 1. conceived or appearing as if conceived by an unrestrained imagination; odd and remarkable; bizarre; grotesque: fantastic rock formations; fantastic designs. 2.&#8230; …

    Universalium

  • 12fantastic — 1. Fantastic is one of the most popular colloquial terms for ‘excellent, very enjoyable’. It is first recorded with this meaning in the 1930s and is now used in all sorts of contexts: • Oh, Val, isn t it fantastic?… It s amazing, isn t it?&#8230; …

    Modern English usage

  • 13Wharton, William — ▪ 2009 Albert William du Aime        American novelist and painter born Nov. 7, 1925, Philadelphia, Pa. died Oct. 29, 2008, Encinitas, Calif. was best known for his innovative first novel, Birdy (1979; filmed 1984), which blended autobiographical …

    Universalium

  • 14Pulpit — • An elevated stand to preach on Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Pulpit     Pulpit     † C …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 15fantastic — 01. For supper we had a [fantastic] 6 course meal, followed by several glasses of champagne. 02. She has done a [fantastic] job of organizing the Christmas party; I m sure it ll be the best one we ve ever had. 03. They had a [fantastic] time in&#8230; …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 16fantastic — [[t]fæntæ̱stɪk[/t]] (The form fantastical is also used for meaning 3.) 1) ADJ GRADED (emphasis) If you say that something is fantastic, you are emphasizing that you think it is very good or that you like it a lot. [INFORMAL] I have a fantastic&#8230; …

    English dictionary

  • 17fantasize — also ise BrE verb (I, T) to imagine something strange, or very pleasant happening to you : fantasize (that): I used to fantasize that my real parents were famous movie stars. (+ about): She would fantasize about her future life with Kyle.&#8230; …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 18AEthusa Cynapium — Fool Fool, n. [OE. fol, n. & adj., F. fol, fou, foolish, mad; a fool, prob. fr. L. follis a bellows, wind bag, an inflated ball; perh. akin to E. bellows. Cf. {Folly}, {Follicle}.] 1. One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of&#8230; …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19Apish — Ap ish, a. Having the qualities of an ape; prone to imitate in a servile manner. Hence: Apelike; fantastically silly; foppish; affected; trifling. [1913 Webster] The apish gallantry of a fantastic boy. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20April fool — Fool Fool, n. [OE. fol, n. & adj., F. fol, fou, foolish, mad; a fool, prob. fr. L. follis a bellows, wind bag, an inflated ball; perh. akin to E. bellows. Cf. {Folly}, {Follicle}.] 1. One destitute of reason, or of the common powers of&#8230; …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English