en tipvogn kaldes også for en gummiged

  • 1acquire a taste for — {v. phr.} To become fond of something; get to like something. * /Jack acquired a taste for ripe cheeses when he went to France./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2allow for — {v.} To provide for; leave room for; give a chance to; permit. * /She cut the skirt four inches longer to allow for a wide hem./ * /Democracy allows for many differences of opinion./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3all right for you — {interj.} I m finished with you! That ends it between you and me! Used by children. * /All right for you! I m not playing with you any more!/ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4along for the ride — {adv. phr.}, {informal} Being in a group for the fun or the credit without doing any of the work. * /He wants no members in his political party who are just along for the ride./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5answer for — {v.} 1. To take responsibility for; assume charge or supervision of. * /The secret service has to answer for the safety of the President and his family./ 2. To say you are sure that (someone) has good character or ability; guarantee: sponsor. *… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6as for — {prep.} 1. In regard to; speaking of; concerning. * /We have plenty of bread, and as for butter, we have more than enough./ 2. Speaking for. * /Most people like the summer but as for me, I like winter much better./ Compare: FOR ONE S PART …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 7ask for — {v.}, {informal} To make (something bad) likely to happen to you; bring (something bad) upon yourself. * /Charles drives fast on worn out tires; he is asking for trouble./ * /The workman lost his job, but he asked for it by coming to work drunk… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 8ask for one's hand — {v. phr.} To ask permission to marry someone. * / Sir, John said timidly to Mary s father, I came to ask for your daughter s hand. / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 9ask for the moon — or[cry for the moon] {v. phr.} To want something that you cannot reach or have; try for the impossible. * /John asked his mother for a hundred dollars today. He s always asking for the moon./ Compare: PROMISE THE MOON …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 10bargain for — or[bargain on] {v.} To be ready for; expect. * /When John started a fight with the smaller boy he got more than he bargained for./ * /The final cost of building the house was much more than they had bargained on./ Compare: COUNT ON …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11bound for — {adj. phr.} On the way to; going to. * /I am bound for the country club./ * /The ship is bound for Liverpool./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12but for — See: EXCEPT FOR …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13buy for a song — {v. phr.} To buy something very cheaply. * /Since the building on the corner was old and neglected, I was able to buy it for a song./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14call for — {v.} 1. To come or go to get (someone or something). * /John called for Mary to take her to the dance./ Syn.: PICK UP. 2. To need; require. * /The cake recipe calls for two cups of flour./ * /Success in school calls for much hard study./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15can't see the wood for the trees — or[can t see the woods for the trees] or[can t see the forest for the trees] {v. phr.} To be unable to judge or understand the whole because of attention to the parts; criticize small things and not see the value or the aim of the future… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16come in for — {v.} To receive. * /He came in for a small fortune when his uncle died./ * /His conduct came in for much criticism./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17come out for — {v. phr.} To support; declare oneself in favor of another, especially during a political election. * /Candidates for the presidency of the United States are anxious for the major newspapers to come out for them./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 18cry for — or[cry out for] {v.}, {informal} To need badly; be lacking in. * /It has not rained for two weeks and the garden is crying for it./ * /The school is crying out for good teachers./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19cry out for — See: CRY FOR …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20do duty for — {v. phr.} To substitute for; act in place of. * /The bench often does duty for a table./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms