deep sensibility

  • 1 deep sensibility — sensibility to stimuli such as pain, movement, and pressure that activate receptors below the body surface but not in the viscera. It includes joint sensibility (arthresthesia) and muscle sense (myesthesia). Called also bathyesthesia …

    Medical dictionary

  • 2 Deep receptor — A deep receptor is an element of the nervous system that is devoted to the reception of deep sensibility (as opposed to tactile sensibility). A deep receptor furnishes information of what is happening in muscle, tendons and joints. They thus… …

    Wikipedia

  • 3 sensibility — [[t]se̱nsɪbɪ̱lɪti[/t]] sensibilities 1) N UNCOUNT: usu supp N Sensibility is the ability to experience deep feelings. Everything he writes demonstrates the depth of his sensibility. ...a man of sensibility. 2) N VAR: usu poss N Someone s… …

    English dictionary

  • 4 sensibility — UK [ˌsensəˈbɪlətɪ] / US noun Word forms sensibility : singular sensibility plural sensibilities 1) [uncountable] formal the ability to experience deep emotions, especially as a reaction to literature or art her fine poetic sensibility 2)… …

    English dictionary

  • 5 sensibility — The consciousness of sensation; the capability of perceiving sensible stimuli. [L. sensibilitas] articular s. appreciation of sensation in joint surfaces. SYN: arthresthesia, joint sense. bone s. SYN: pallesthesia …

    Medical dictionary

  • 6 sensibility — sen|si|bil|i|ty [ ,sensə bıləti ] noun 1. ) uncount FORMAL the ability to experience deep emotions, especially as a reaction to literature or art 2. ) sensibilities plural someone s tendency to be shocked or offended by something: I hope I didn t …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 7 mesoblastic sensibility — deep s …

    Medical dictionary

  • 8 W. H. R. Rivers — Photograph of Rivers taken by Henry Maull Born 12 March 1864(1864 03 12) …

    Wikipedia

  • 9 bathyhyperesthesia — Exaggerated sensitiveness of deep structures, e.g., muscular tissue. [G. bathys, deep, + hyper, above, + aisthesis, sensation] * * * bathy·hy·per·es·the·sia (bath″e hi″pər es theґzhə) [bathy + hyperesthesia] increased… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 10 bathyanesthesia — Loss of deep sensibility, i.e., from muscles, ligaments, tendons, bones, and joints. [G. bathys, deep, + an priv. + aisthesis, sensation] * * * bathy·an·es·the·sia (bath″e an″es theґzhə) [bathy + anesthesia] loss of deep… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 11 bathyesthesia — General term for all sensation from the tissues beneath the skin, i.e., muscles, ligaments, tendons, bones and joints. SEE ALSO: myesthesia. SYN: deep sensibility. [G. bathys, deep, + aisthesis, sensation] * * * bathy·es·the·sia (bath″e es… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 12 Sense — In biology and medicine, the faculty of sensory reception. The ability to convey specific types of external or internal stimuli to the brain and perceive them. Sensory reception occurs through a process known as transduction in which stimuli are… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 13 Byzantine literature — may be defined as the Greek literature of the Middle Ages, whether written in the territory of the Byzantine Empire or outside its bordersEncyclopaedia Britannica Greek literature: Byzantine literature ] . It forms the second period in the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 Byzantine Literature — • The four cultural elements included are the Greek, the Christian, the Roman, and the Oriental Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Byzantine Literature     Byzantine Literature …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 15 bathyhypesthesia — Impairment of sensation in the structures beneath the skin, e.g., muscle tissue. [G. bathys, deep, + hypo, under, + aisthesis, sensation] * * * bathy·hyp·es·the·sia (bath″e hip″es theґzhə) [bathy + hypesthesia] decreased deep… …

    Medical dictionary

  • 16 Visceral — Vis cer*al, a. [Cf. F. visc[ e]ral, LL. visceralis.] 1. (Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or affecting the viscera; splanchnic. [1913 Webster] 2. Fig.: Having deep sensibility. [R.] Bp. Reynolds. [1913 Webster] 3. proceeding from emotion or instinct… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 17 Visceral arches — Visceral Vis cer*al, a. [Cf. F. visc[ e]ral, LL. visceralis.] 1. (Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or affecting the viscera; splanchnic. [1913 Webster] 2. Fig.: Having deep sensibility. [R.] Bp. Reynolds. [1913 Webster] 3. proceeding from emotion or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 18 Visceral cavity — Visceral Vis cer*al, a. [Cf. F. visc[ e]ral, LL. visceralis.] 1. (Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or affecting the viscera; splanchnic. [1913 Webster] 2. Fig.: Having deep sensibility. [R.] Bp. Reynolds. [1913 Webster] 3. proceeding from emotion or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 19 Visceral clefts — Visceral Vis cer*al, a. [Cf. F. visc[ e]ral, LL. visceralis.] 1. (Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or affecting the viscera; splanchnic. [1913 Webster] 2. Fig.: Having deep sensibility. [R.] Bp. Reynolds. [1913 Webster] 3. proceeding from emotion or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 20 Visceral tube — Visceral Vis cer*al, a. [Cf. F. visc[ e]ral, LL. visceralis.] 1. (Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or affecting the viscera; splanchnic. [1913 Webster] 2. Fig.: Having deep sensibility. [R.] Bp. Reynolds. [1913 Webster] 3. proceeding from emotion or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English