curfew

  • 1 Curfew — Cur few (k[^u]r f[=u]), n. [OE. courfew, curfu, fr. OF. cuevrefu, covrefeu, F. couvre feu; covrir to cover + feu fire, fr. L. focus fireplace, hearth. See {Cover}, and {Focus}.] 1. The ringing of an evening bell, originally a signal to the… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 2 curfew — (n.) early 14c., evening signal, ringing of a bell at a fixed hour, from Anglo Fr. coeverfu (late 13c.), from O.Fr. cuevrefeu, lit. cover fire (Mod.Fr. couvre few), from cuevre, imper. of covrir to cover (see COVER (Cf. cover) (v.)) + feu fire… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 3 curfew — ► NOUN 1) a regulation requiring people to remain indoors between specified hours, typically at night. 2) the time at which such a restriction begins. ORIGIN originally denoting a regulation requiring fires to be extinguished at a fixed hour in… …

    English terms dictionary

  • 4 curfew — [kʉr′fyo͞o΄] n. [ME curfeu < OFr covrefeu, lit., cover fire < covrir (see COVER) + feu, fire < L focus, fireplace: see FOCUS] 1. a) in the Middle Ages, the ringing of a bell every evening as a signal for people to cover fires, put out… …

    English World dictionary

  • 5 Curfew — This article is about the curfew law. For the band, see Curfew (band). For the song by Drive, see Curfew (song). For the song by Eddy Grant, see Message Man. A curfew is an order specifying a time after which certain regulations apply.[1]… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 curfew — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ strict ▪ 24 hour, dusk to dawn ▪ night, night time ▪ 7 p.m., etc …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 7 curfew — n. 1) to impose a curfew 2) to lift a curfew 3) a midnight curfew * * * [ kɜːfjuː] a midnight curfew to impose a curfew to lift a curfew …

    Combinatory dictionary

  • 8 curfew — noun Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo French coverfeu, signal given to bank the hearth fire, curfew, from coverir to cover + fu, feu fire, from Latin focus hearth Date: 14th century 1. the sounding of a bell at evening < the Curfew tolls the …

    New Collegiate Dictionary

  • 9 curfew — cur|few [ˈkə:fju: US ˈkə:r ] n [U and C] [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: covrefeu signal to put out fires, curfew , from covrir to cover + feu fire ] 1.) a law that forces people to stay indoors after a particular time at night, or the… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 10 curfew — /kerr fyooh/, n. 1. an order establishing a specific time in the evening after which certain regulations apply, esp. that no civilians or other specified group of unauthorized persons may be outdoors or that places of public assembly must be… …

    Universalium

  • 11 curfew — cur•few [[t]ˈkɜr fyu[/t]] n. 1) an order establishing a time in the evening after which certain regulations apply, esp. that no unauthorized persons may be outdoors or that places of public assembly must be closed 2) a regulation requiring a… …

    From formal English to slang

  • 12 curfew — [[t]kɜ͟ː(r)fjuː[/t]] curfews N VAR A curfew is a law stating that people must stay inside their houses after a particular time at night, for example during a war. The village was placed under curfew... In Lucknow crowds of people defied the… …

    English dictionary

  • 13 curfew — UK [ˈkɜː(r)fjuː] / US [ˈkɜrˌfju] noun [countable/uncountable] Word forms curfew : singular curfew plural curfews 1) a) a law that does not allow people to go outside between a particular time in the evening and a particular time in the morning b) …

    English dictionary

  • 14 curfew — cur·few || kɜːfjuː n. set time when a person (or people) must be indoors; signal or bell that announces the start of curfew restrictions; decree ordering that after a specific time specific activities outside on the streets are forbidden by… …

    English contemporary dictionary

  • 15 curfew — noun 1 (C) a law forcing everyone to stay indoors from a particular time in the evening until a particular time in the morning: The military regime decided to impose a curfew. 2 (singular, not with the ) the time after which everyone must stay… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 16 Curfew — Borough regulations required fires to be covered; for this reason people had to be home and off the street by a certain time to ensure this was done. Houses of wood were highly flammable; fires spread with ease and rapidity. Hence the necessity… …

    Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • 17 curfew — cur|few [ kɜr,fju ] noun count or uncount a law that does not allow people to go outside between a particular time in the evening and a particular time in the morning a. the period of time during which people must not go outside according to a… …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 18 curfew — [13] Curfew means literally ‘coverfire’. It was introduced into English via Anglo Norman coeverfu from Old French covrefeu, which was formed from covrir ‘cover’ and feu ‘fire’ (feu was a descendant of Latin focus ‘hearth’, which has given English …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 19 curfew — A law (commonly an ordinance) which imposes on people (particularly children) the obligation to remove themselves from the streets on or before a certain time of night. An institution supposed to have been introduced into England by order of… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 20 curfew — A law (commonly an ordinance) which imposes on people (particularly children) the obligation to remove themselves from the streets on or before a certain time of night. An institution supposed to have been introduced into England by order of… …

    Black's law dictionary


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