assess

  • 1 assess — as‧sess [əˈses] verb [intransitive, transitive] 1. to make a judgement about a person or situation after considering all the information: • This information is needed to assess efficiency and effectiveness. assess that • The federal government… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 2 assess — as·sess /ə ses/ vt 1: to determine the rate or amount of (as a tax) 2 a: to impose (as a tax) according to an established rate b: to subject to a tax, charge, or levy each property owner was assess ed an additional five dollars 3 …

    Law dictionary

  • 3 Assess — As*sess , v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Assessed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Assessing}.] [OF. assesser to regulate, settle, LL. assessare to value for taxation, fr. L. assidere, supine as if assessum, to sit by, esp. of judges in a court, in LL. to assess, tax.… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 4 assess — [v1] evaluate, determine appraise, apprise, assay, check*, check out*, compute, determine, dig it*, estimate, figure*, fix, gauge, guess, judge, nick*, peg*, rate, reckon, set, size*, size up, survey, take measure*, valuate, value, weigh; concept …

    New thesaurus

  • 5 assess — (v.) early 15c., to fix the amount (of a tax, fine, etc.), from Anglo Fr. assesser, from M.L. assessare fix a tax upon, originally frequentative of L. assessus a sitting by, pp. of assidere to sit beside (and thus to assist in the office of a… …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 6 assess — assay, appraise, value, evaluate, *estimate, rate Analogous words: *calculate, compute, reckon …

    New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • 7 assess — ► VERB 1) evaluate or estimate. 2) set the value of a tax, fine, etc. for (a person or property). DERIVATIVES assessable adjective assessment noun assessor noun. ORIGIN Old French assesser, from Latin assidere sit by (later levy tax) …

    English terms dictionary

  • 8 assess — [ə ses′] vt. [ME assessen < OFr assesser < ML assessare, to impose a tax, set a rate < L assessus, pp. of assidere, to sit beside, assist in the office of judge < ad , to + sedere, to SIT] 1. to set an estimated value on (property,… …

    English World dictionary

  • 9 assess — 01. We will use the first week of classes to [assess] your speaking ability. 02. The [assessment] of your language skills will include a speaking test and an essay assignment. 03. It may take weeks to [assess] the total damage caused by the… …

    Grammatical examples in English

  • 10 assess — verb 1 form an opinion ADVERB ▪ fully ▪ accurately, correctly, properly ▪ carefully ▪ She carefully assessed the situation …

    Collocations dictionary

  • 11 assess */*/ — UK [əˈses] / US verb [transitive] Word forms assess : present tense I/you/we/they assess he/she/it assesses present participle assessing past tense assessed past participle assessed 1) to carefully consider a situation, person, or problem in… …

    English dictionary

  • 12 assess — as|sess W2S2 [əˈses] v [T] [Date: 1400 1500; : Old French; Origin: assesser, from Latin, past participle of assidere to sit beside, help in making judgments , from ad to + sedere to sit ] 1.) to make a judgment about a person or situation after… …

    Dictionary of contemporary English

  • 13 assess — [[t]əse̱s[/t]] ♦♦♦ assesses, assessing, assessed 1) VERB When you assess a person, thing, or situation, you consider them in order to make a judgement about them. [V n] Our correspondent has been assessing the impact of the sanctions... [V n] The …

    English dictionary

  • 14 assess — verb (T) 1 to make a judgment about a person or situation after thinking carefully about it: It s difficult to assess the effects of the new legislation just yet. | assess what/how etc: We ve tried to assess what went wrong. 2 to calculate the… …

    Longman dictionary of contemporary English

  • 15 assess — [15] The literal meaning of Latin assidēre, ultimate source of assess, was ‘sit beside someone’ (it was a compound verb formed from the prefix ad ‘near’ and sedēre ‘sit’, a relative of English sit). This developed the secondary meaning ‘sit next… …

    The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins

  • 16 assess — [15] The literal meaning of Latin assidēre, ultimate source of assess, was ‘sit beside someone’ (it was a compound verb formed from the prefix ad ‘near’ and sedēre ‘sit’, a relative of English sit). This developed the secondary meaning ‘sit next… …

    Word origins

  • 17 assess — assessable, adj. /euh ses /, v.t. 1. to estimate officially the value of (property, income, etc.) as a basis for taxation. 2. to fix or determine the amount of (damages, a tax, a fine, etc.): The hurricane damage was assessed at six million… …

    Universalium

  • 18 assess — as|sess [ ə ses ] verb transitive ** 1. ) to carefully consider a situation, person, or problem in order to make a judgment: We tried to assess his suitability for the job. 2. ) to calculate what something costs or is worth: Our agent will assess …

    Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • 19 assess — [əˈses] verb [T] 1) to think about something carefully and make a judgment about it We tried to assess his suitability for the job.[/ex] Our agent will assess the value of your property.[/ex] assessment noun [C/U] 2) a clear assessment of the… …

    Dictionary for writing and speaking English

  • 20 assess — as•sess [[t]əˈsɛs[/t]] v. t. 1) bus to estimate officially the value of (property) for tax purposes 2) bus to determine the amount of (damages, a fine, etc.) 3) bus to impose a tax or other charge on:to assess members for painting the clubhouse.… …

    From formal English to slang


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