artesische put

  • 1cart before the horse (to put) — {n. phr.}, {informal} Things in wrong order; something backwards or mixed up. An overused expression. Usually used with put but sometimes with get or have . * /When the salesman wanted money for goods he hadn t delivered, I told him he was… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2hard put — or[hard put to it] {adj.} In a difficult position; faced with difficulty; barely able. * /John was hard put to find a good excuse for his lateness in coming to school./ * /The scouts found themselves hard put to it to find the way home./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3put — See: HARD PUT or HARD PUT TO IT, STAY PUT …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4put about — {v. phr.} Nautical usage. To turn in the opposite direction; turn around. * /When we saw the storm clouds thickening in the sky, we put about quickly and raced ashore./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5put a bug in one's ear — or[put a flea in one s ear] See: BUG IN ONE S EAR …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6put across — {v.} 1. To explain clearly; make yourself understood; communicate. * /He knew how to put his ideas across./ Compare: GET ACROSS. 2. {informal} To get (something) done successfully; bring to success; make real. * /He put across a big sales… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 7put all one's eggs in one basket — {v. phr.} To place all your efforts, interests, or hopes in a single person or thing. * /Going steady in high school is putting all your eggs in one basket too soon./ * /To buy stock in a single company is to put all your eggs in one basket./ *… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 8put an end to — or[put a stop to] {v. phr.} 1. To make (something) end; stop; end. * /The farmer built an electric fence around his field to put an end to trespassing./ * /The principal said that running in the halls was dangerous, and told the teachers to put a …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 9put aside — {v. phr.} 1. To save; put something aside for a special purpose. * /Peter puts $100 aside every week./ 2. To let go of; put away. * /The teacher to the students, Put your books aside and start writing your tests! / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 10put away — {v.} 1. To put in the right place or out of sight. * /She put away the towels./ 2. To lay aside; stop thinking about. * /He put his worries away for the weekend./ 3. {informal} To eat or drink. * /He put away a big supper and three cups of coffee …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11put back the clock — or[turn back the clock] {v. phr.} To go back in time; relive the past. * /If I could put back the clock I d give more thought to preparing for a career./ * /Richard wishes that he had lived in frontier days, but he can t turn back the clock./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12put by — {v.} To save for the future; lay aside. * /He had put by a good sum during a working lifetime./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13put down — {v. phr.} 1. To stop by force, crush. * /In 24 hours the general had entirely put down the rebellion./ 2. To put a stop to; check. * /She had patiently put down unkind talk by living a good life./ 3. To write a record of; write down. * /He put… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14put forth — {v. phr.} To produce; issue; send out. * /In the spring the apple trees put forth beautiful white blossoms./ * /The chairman of the board put forth an innovative proposal that was circulated by mail./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15put ideas into one's head — {v. phr.} To persuade someone to do something negative; put one up to something. * /Billy would never have poured glue into his father s shoes if the neighbor s son hadn t been putting ideas into his head./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16put in — {v.} 1. To add to what has been said; say (something) in addition to what others say. * /While the boys were discussing the car accident, Ben put in that the road was icy./ * /My father put in a word for me and I got the job./ 2. To buy and keep… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17put in a word for — {v. phr.} To speak in favor of someone; recommend someone. * / Don t worry about your job application, Sam said to Tim. I ll put in a word for you with the selection committee. / …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 18put in an appearance — also[make an appearance] {v. phr.} To be present, esp. for a short time; visit; appear. * /He put in an appearance at work, but he was too ill to stay./ * /The president put in an appearance at several dances the evening after he was sworn in./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19put in one's place — {v. phr.}, {informal} To criticize someone for impolite boldness; remind someone of low rank or position; reduce someone s unsuitable pride; deflate. * /The assistant was trying to take command when the professor put him in his place by saying,… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20put in one's way — See: PUT IN THE WAY OF …

    Dictionary of American idioms