amount of fixed assets

  • 1Fixed Assets Register — A Fixed Asset Register (FAR) is an accounting method used for major resources of a business.Fixed Assets are assets such as land, machines, office equipments, buildings, patents, trademarks, copyrights, etc. held for the purpose of production of… …

    Wikipedia

  • 2Revaluation of fixed assets — In finance, a revaluation of fixed assets is a technique that may be required to accurately describe the true value of the capital goods a business owns.Fixed assets are held by an enterprise for the purpose of producing goods or rendering… …

    Wikipedia

  • 3Fixed investment — in economics refers to investment in fixed capital, i.e. tangible capital goods (real means of production or residential buildings), or to the replacement of depreciated capital goods. Thus, fixed investment is investment in physical assets such… …

    Wikipedia

  • 4Fixed Capital — Assets or capital investments that are needed to start up and conduct business, even at a minimal stage. These assets are considered fixed in that they are not used up in the actual production of a good or service, but have a reusable value.… …

    Investment dictionary

  • 5fixed capital — The amount of an organization s capital that is tied up in its fixed assets …

    Accounting dictionary

  • 6fixed capital — The amount of an organization s capital that is tied up in its fixed assets …

    Big dictionary of business and management

  • 7fixed capital — The amount of money which is permanently invested in the business. May also refer to capital invested in fixed assets (land, buildings, machinery, etc.). Cost of total plant and general equipment. Lindheimer v. Illinois Bell Telephone Co., 111.,… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 8fixed capital — The amount of money which is permanently invested in the business. May also refer to capital invested in fixed assets (land, buildings, machinery, etc.). Cost of total plant and general equipment. Lindheimer v. Illinois Bell Telephone Co., 111.,… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 9Fixed income attribution — refers to the process of measuring returns generated by various sources of risk in a fixed income portfolio, particularly when multiple sources of return are active at the same time. For example, the risks affecting the return of a bond portfolio …

    Wikipedia

  • 10Fixed-income attribution — refers to the process of measuring returns generated by various sources of risk in a fixed income portfolio, particularly when multiple sources of return are active at the same time. For example, the risks affecting the return of a bond portfolio …

    Wikipedia

  • 11fixed charge — n: a regularly recurring expense (as rent, taxes, or interest) that must be met when due Merriam Webster’s Dictionary of Law. Merriam Webster. 1996. fixed charge …

    Law dictionary

  • 12Fixed-income instruments — Assets that pay a fixed dollar amount, such as bonds and preferred stock. The New York Times Financial Glossary …

    Financial and business terms

  • 13fixed income instruments — assets that pay a fixed dollar amount, such as bonds and preferred stock. Bloomberg Financial Dictionary …

    Financial and business terms

  • 14Fixed exchange-rate system — Foreign exchange Exchange rates Currency band Exchange rate Exchange rate regime Exchange rate flexibil …

    Wikipedia

  • 15Consumption of fixed capital — (CFC) is a term used in business accounts, tax assessments and national accounts for depreciation of fixed assets. CFC is used in preference to depreciation to emphasize that fixed capital is used up in the process of generating new output, and… …

    Wikipedia

  • 16Nonmonetary Assets — Assets in which the right to receive a fixed or determinable amount of currency is absent. This feature distinguishes nonmonetary assets from monetary assets such as cash, bank deposits, and accounts and notes receivable, which can be converted… …

    Investment dictionary

  • 17Notional amount — The notional amount (or notional principal amount or notional value) on a financial instrument is the nominal or face amount that is used to calculate payments made on that instrument. This amount generally does not change hands and is thus… …

    Wikipedia

  • 18Face-Amount Certificate Company — A type of investment firm that issues debt securities to its investors. These securities are called face amount certificates and are backed by security interest on assets such as real property or other securities. This is similar in nature to… …

    Investment dictionary

  • 19accounting — /euh kown ting/, n. 1. the theory and system of setting up, maintaining, and auditing the books of a firm; art of analyzing the financial position and operating results of a business house from a study of its sales, purchases, overhead, etc.… …

    Universalium

  • 20Depreciation — Not to be confused with Deprecation. Depreciation refers to two very different but related concepts: the decrease in value of assets (fair value depreciation), and the allocation of the cost of assets to periods in which the assets are used… …

    Wikipedia