amortization of debts

  • 1amortization — (n.) 1670s, in reference to lands given to religious orders, from M.L. amortizationem (nom. amortizatio), noun of action from pp. stem of amortizare (see AMORTIZE (Cf. amortize)). Of debts, from 1824 …

    Etymology dictionary

  • 2discharge — dis·charge 1 /dis chärj, dis ˌchärj/ vt 1: to release from an obligation: as a: to relieve of a duty under an instrument (as a contract or a negotiable instrument); also: to render (an instrument) no longer enforceable a formal instrument...may… …

    Law dictionary

  • 3company — a business owned by a group of people called shareholders, which has its own legal identity separate from its owners. Glossary of Business Terms A proprietorship, partnership, corporation, or other form of enterprise that engages in business.… …

    Financial and business terms

  • 4Securitization — is a structured finance process, which involves pooling and repackaging of cash flow producing financial assets into securities that are then sold to investors. The name securitization is derived from the fact that the form of financial… …

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  • 5Book value — In accounting, book value or carrying value is the value of an asset or according to its balance sheet account balance. For assets, the value is based on the original cost of the asset less any depreciation, amortization or impairment costs made… …

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  • 6Loan origination — is the process by which a borrower applies for a new loan, and a lender processes that application. Origination generally includes all the steps from taking a loan application through disbursal of funds (or declining the application). Loan… …

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  • 7trust — A legal entity created by a grantor for the benefit of designated beneficiaries under the laws of the state and the valid trust instrument. The trustee holds a fiduciary responsibility to manage the trust s corpus assets and income for the… …

    Black's law dictionary

  • 8Faux frais of production — is a concept used by classical political economists and by Karl Marx in his critique of political economy. It refers to incidental operating expenses incurred in the productive investment of capital, which do not themselves add new value to… …

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  • 9ECONOMIC HISTORY — This article is arranged according to the following outline: first temple period exile and restoration second temple period talmudic era muslim middle ages medieval christendom economic doctrines early modern period sephardim and ashkenazim… …

    Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • 10Treasury Regulation 1.183-2 — is a Treasury Regulation in the United States, outlining the taxes owed from income deriving from non business, non investment activity. Expenses relating to for profit activities, such as business and investment activities, are generally tax… …

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  • 11Financial ratio — Corporate finance …

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  • 12Domingo Cavallo — Domingo Felipe Mingo Cavallo (born July 21, 1946) is an Argentine economist and politician. He has a long history of public service and is known for implementing the Convertibilidad plan, which fixed the dollar peso exchange rate at 1:1 between… …

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  • 13Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (United States) — In the U.S., generally accepted accounting principles, commonly abbreviated as US GAAP or simply GAAP, are accounting rules used to prepare, present, and report financial statements for a wide variety of entities, including publicly traded and… …

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  • 14Interest-only loan — An interest only loan is a loan in which for a set term the borrower pays only the interest on the principal balance, with the principal balance unchanged. At the end of the interest only term the borrower may enter an interest only mortgage, pay …

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  • 15Operating cash flow — In financial accounting, operating cash flow (OCF), cash flow provided by operations or cash flow from operating activities (CFO), refers to the amount of cash a company generates from the revenues it brings in, excluding costs associated with… …

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  • 16Taimur bin Feisal — al Wasik Billah al Majid Sayyid Taimur bin Faisal bin Turki, KCIE, CSI (1886 ndash; 1965) (Arabic: تيمور بن فيصل بن تركي) was the sultan of Muscat and Oman from October 15, 1913 to February 10, 1932. He was born at Muscat and succeeded his father …

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  • 17Société à responsabilité limitée — A Société à responsabilité limitée, also known by the acronym SARL (sometimes SÀRL or Sàrl), is a form of private limited liability corporate entity that exists in France, Switzerland, Luxembourg, Macau, Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia, and has… …

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  • 18Subprime lending — Subprime redirects here. For the 2007 house mortgage crisis, see Subprime mortgage crisis. In finance, subprime lending (also referred to as near prime, non prime, and second chance lending) means making loans to people who may have difficulty… …

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  • 19Mortgage underwriting in the United States — is the process a lender uses to determine if the risk of offering a mortgage loan to a particular borrower under certain parameters is acceptable. Most of the risks and terms that underwriters consider fall under the three C’s of underwriting:… …

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  • 20Ottoman public debt — The Ottoman public debt was a term which dated back to 4 August 1854,[1] when the Ottoman Empire first entered into loan contracts with its European creditors shortly after the beginning of the Crimean War.[2] The Empire entered into subsequent… …

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