aim at the sun and you may not reach it; but your arrow will fly higher than if aimed at an object on a level with yourself.

  • 1aim — See: TAKE AIM …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2take aim — {v. phr.} To get ready to hit, throw at, or shoot at by sighting carefully. * /When the captain orders Take aim, raise your gun to your shoulder and sight along the barrel at the target./ * /Before the hunter could take aim, the deer jumped out… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3aim — See: TAKE AIM …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 4take aim — {v. phr.} To get ready to hit, throw at, or shoot at by sighting carefully. * /When the captain orders Take aim, raise your gun to your shoulder and sight along the barrel at the target./ * /Before the hunter could take aim, the deer jumped out… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 5aim — Command Com*mand , n. 1. An authoritative order requiring obedience; a mandate; an injunction. [1913 Webster] Awaiting what command their mighty chief Had to impose. Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. The possession or exercise of authority. [1913… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 6Aim — Aim, v. t. To direct or point, as a weapon, at a particular object; to direct, as a missile, an act, or a proceeding, at, to, or against an object; as, to aim a musket or an arrow, the fist or a blow (at something); to aim a satire or a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 7Aim — Aim, n. [Cf. OF. esme estimation, fr. esmer. See {Aim}, v. i.] 1. The pointing of a weapon, as a gun, a dart, or an arrow, in the line of direction with the object intended to be struck; the line of fire; the direction of anything, as a spear, a… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 8Aim — Aim, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Aimed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Aiming}.] [OE. amen, aimen, eimen, to guess at, to estimate, to aim, OF. esmer, asmer, fr. L. aestimare to estimate; or perh. fr. OF. aesmer; ? (L. ad) + esmer. See {Estimate}.] 1. To point or… …

    The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • 9СТИНГ (Sting) — (наст. имя Самнер Гордон Samner Gordon) (р. 1952), английский певец, композитор, киноактер. Один из лидеров современной поп музыки. Первый самостоятельный альбом The Dream Of Blue Turtles (Сон про голубых черепах) (1985). Лучшие песни: Love Is… …

    Большой Энциклопедический словарь

  • 10ЭНИМАЛЗ — (The Animals) английская Группа, образована в 1961. Состав: Алан Прайс (клавишные), Эрик Бердон (вокал), Брайан Чендлер (бас), Джон Стил (ударные), Хилтон Валентайн (гитара). Один из лидеров в истории мирового рока. На музыку группы в большой… …

    Большой Энциклопедический словарь

  • 11at heart — {adv. phr.} 1. In spite of appearances; at bottom; in reality. * /His manners are rough but he is a kind man at heart./ 2. As a serious interest or concern; as an important aim or goal. * /He has the welfare of the poor at heart./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12bark up the wrong tree — {v. phr.}, {informal} To choose the wrong person to deal with or the wrong course of action; mistake an aim. * /If he thinks he can fool me, he is barking up the wrong tree./ * /He is barking up the wrong tree when he blames his troubles on bad… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13can't see the wood for the trees — or[can t see the woods for the trees] or[can t see the forest for the trees] {v. phr.} To be unable to judge or understand the whole because of attention to the parts; criticize small things and not see the value or the aim of the future… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14carry the day — {v. phr.}, {informal} To win completely; to succeed in getting one s aim accomplished. * /The defense attorney s summary before the jury helped him carry the day./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15draw a bead on — {v. phr.} {informal} 1. To aim at; sight (with a gun). * /The deer bounded into the forest before the hunters could draw a bead on them./ * /John drew a bead on the elk, but didn t have the heart to pull the trigger./ 2. To take (something) as an …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16end in itself — {n. phr.} Something wanted for its own sake; a purpose, aim, or goal we want for itself alone and not as a way to something else. * /The miser never spent his gold because for him it was an end in itself./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17fall short — {v.} To fail to reach (some aim); not succeed. * /His jump fell three inches short of the world record./ * /The movie fell short of expectations./ Contrast: MEASURE UP …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 18get at — {v.} 1. To reach an understanding of; find out the meaning. * /This book is very hard to get at./ 2. To do harm to. * /The cat is on the chair trying to get at the canary./ Compare: GET BACK AT. 3. To have a chance to do; attend to. * /I hope I… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19go for — {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To try to get; aim for; try for. * /Our team is going for the championship in the game tonight./ * /The dog went for Bob s leg./ 2. To favor; support; like. * /Little Susie really goes for ice cream./ * /Bob goes for Jane …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20hang around — {v.}, {informal} 1. To pass time or stay near without any real purpose or aim; loaf near or in. * /The principal warned the students not to hang around the corner drugstore after school./ Compare: HANG OUT(1). 2. To spend time or associate, *… …

    Dictionary of American idioms