acute criticism

  • 1 Criticism of the National Health Service — The logo of the NHS for England. The colour, NHS Blue (Pantone 300, coincidentally the same as the blue of the Flag of Scotland), is used on signs and leaflets throughout the NHS in England. The National Health Service (NHS) is the publicly… …

    Wikipedia

  • 2 Historical Criticism — • The art of distinguishing the true from the false concerning facts of the past Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Historical Criticism     Historical Criticism      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 3 Severe acute respiratory syndrome — SARS redirects here. For other uses, see SARS (disambiguation). Further information: Progress of the SARS outbreak Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Classification and external resources SARS coronavirus (SARS CoV) is causative of the syndrome …

    Wikipedia

  • 4 Biblical Criticism (Higher) —     Biblical Criticism (Higher)     † Catholic Encyclopedia ► Biblical Criticism (Higher)     Biblical criticism in its fullest comprehension is the examination of the literary origins and historical values of the books composing the Bible, with… …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 5 Chiropractic controversy and criticism — Throughout its history chiropractic has been the subject of internal and external controversy and criticism.[1][2] According to Daniel D. Palmer, the founder of chiropractic, subluxation is the sole cause of disease and manipulation is the cure… …

    Wikipedia

  • 6 Julius Caesar Scaliger — or Giulio Cesare della Scala (April 23, 1484 ndash; October 21, 1558), was an Italian scholar and physician spending a large part of his career in France. He employed the techniques and discoveries of Renaissance humanism to defend… …

    Wikipedia

  • 7 Abraham ben David — Rabbeinu Abraham ben David was a Provençal rabbi, a great commentator on the Talmud, Sefer Halachot of rabbi Yitzhak Alfasi and Mishne Torah of Maimonides, and is regarded as a father of Kabbalah and one of the key and important links in the… …

    Wikipedia

  • 8 Monarchy of Spain — King of Spain redirects here. For other uses, see King of Spain (disambiguation). King of Spain Monarchy …

    Wikipedia

  • 9 James Harrison Rigg — (January 16, 1821 – April 7, 1909), English nonconformist divine, was born at Newcastle on Tyne.His father was a Wesleyan minister and sent his son to the Old Kingswood School, Bristol, where he subsequently became an assistant teacher. In 1845… …

    Wikipedia

  • 10 Jan Smuts and the Old Boers — Jan Christian Smuts, OM (May 24, 1870 ndash; September 11, 1950) was a prominent South African and Commonwealth statesman and military leader. He served as a Boer General during the Boer War, a British General during the First World War and was… …

    Wikipedia

  • 11 Dionysius of Alexandria — • Also called Dionysius the Great. Bishop, d. 264 or 265 Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Dionysius of Alexandria     Dionysius of Alexandria      …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 12 August Schmarsow — (26 May 1853 26 January 1936) was a German art historian. He was born at Schildfeld, Mecklenburg Schwerin, and was educated in Zürich, Strassburg and Bonn. He became docent of the history of art at Göttingen in 1881, professor there in 1882, at… …

    Wikipedia

  • 13 Idea Star Singer — infobox television | show name = Idea Star Singer caption = format = Interactive Reality Game Show runtime = 60 or 90 minutes per episode creator = Asianet judges = M. G. Sreekumar (2007 2008) Ouseppachan (2008) P. Unnikrishnan (2008) Sharath… …

    Wikipedia

  • 14 Saint-Pierre, Charles-Irénée Castel, abbé de — ▪ French author original name  Charles irénée Castel   born Feb. 13, 1658, Saint Pierre Église, Fr. died April 29, 1743, Paris       influential French publicist and reformist, one of the first modern European writers to propose an international… …

    Universalium

  • 15 Belief — • That state of the mind by which it assents to propositions, not by reason of their intrinsic evidence, but because of authority Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Belief     Belief …

    Catholic encyclopedia

  • 16 Germany — /jerr meuh nee/, n. a republic in central Europe: after World War II divided into four zones, British, French, U.S., and Soviet, and in 1949 into East Germany and West Germany; East and West Germany were reunited in 1990. 84,068,216; 137,852 sq.… …

    Universalium

  • 17 English literature — Introduction       the body of written works produced in the English language by inhabitants of the British Isles (including Ireland) from the 7th century to the present day. The major literatures written in English outside the British Isles are… …

    Universalium

  • 18 performing arts — arts or skills that require public performance, as acting, singing, or dancing. [1945 50] * * * ▪ 2009 Introduction Music Classical.       The last vestiges of the Cold War seemed to thaw for a moment on Feb. 26, 2008, when the unfamiliar strains …

    Universalium

  • 19 Europe, history of — Introduction       history of European peoples and cultures from prehistoric times to the present. Europe is a more ambiguous term than most geographic expressions. Its etymology is doubtful, as is the physical extent of the area it designates.… …

    Universalium

  • 20 United States — a republic in the N Western Hemisphere comprising 48 conterminous states, the District of Columbia, and Alaska in North America, and Hawaii in the N Pacific. 267,954,767; conterminous United States, 3,022,387 sq. mi. (7,827,982 sq. km); with… …

    Universalium