приближение к действительности w aproximation to the truth

  • 1children and fools speak the truth — Children and fools say things without thinking; they say what they think or know when grown ups might not think it was polite or wise to do so. A proverb. * / Uncle Willie is too fat, said little Agnes. Children and fools speak the truth, said… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 2children and fools speak the truth — Children and fools say things without thinking; they say what they think or know when grown ups might not think it was polite or wise to do so. A proverb. * / Uncle Willie is too fat, said little Agnes. Children and fools speak the truth, said… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 3The Whole Truth (The Twilight Zone) — Infobox Television episode Title = The Whole Truth Series = The Twilight Zone Caption = Jack Carson, Jack Ging and Nan Peterson in The Whole Truth Season = 2 Episode = 50 Airdate =January 20, 1961 Production = 173 3666 Writer =Rod Serling… …

    Wikipedia

  • 4The Sword of Truth — Cover designs for the 11 books of the first edition In Chronological Order[1] …

    Wikipedia

  • 5blow the lid off — {v. phr.}, {informal} Suddenly to reveal the truth about a matter that has been kept as a secret either by private persons or by some governmental agency. * /The clever journalists blew the lid off the Watergate cover up./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 6get the goods on — or[have the goods on] {v. phr.}, {slang} To find out true and, often, bad information about; discover what is wrong with; be able to prove the guilt of. * /Tell the truth, Johnny. We know who your girl is because we ve got the goods on you./ *… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 7give the devil his due — {v. phr.} To be fair, even to someone who is bad; tell the truth about a person even though you don t like him, * /I don t like Mr. Jones, but to give the devil his due, I must admit that he is a good teacher./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 8on the level — {adj. phr.}, {informal} Honest and fair; telling the whole truth. * /Our teacher respects the students who are on the level with her./ * /Joyce wondered if the fortune teller was on the level./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 9shoot from the hip — {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To fire a gun held at the hip without aiming by aligning the barrel with one s eye. * /In many Western movies the heroic sheriff defeats the villains by shooting from the hip./ 2. To speak sincerely, frankly, and without… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 10the score — {n.}, {slang} The truth; the real story or information; what is really happening; the way people and the world really are. * /Very few people know the score in politics./ * /You are too young to know the score yet./ * /What s the score anyhow?… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 11truth — See: CHILDREN AND FOOLS SPEAK THE TRUTH …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 12wide of the mark — {adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Far from the target or the thing aimed at. * /James threw a stone at the cat but it went wide of the mark./ 2. Far from the truth; incorrect. * /You were wide of the mark when you said I did it, because Bill did it./… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 13blow the lid off — {v. phr.}, {informal} Suddenly to reveal the truth about a matter that has been kept as a secret either by private persons or by some governmental agency. * /The clever journalists blew the lid off the Watergate cover up./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 14get the goods on — or[have the goods on] {v. phr.}, {slang} To find out true and, often, bad information about; discover what is wrong with; be able to prove the guilt of. * /Tell the truth, Johnny. We know who your girl is because we ve got the goods on you./ *… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 15give the devil his due — {v. phr.} To be fair, even to someone who is bad; tell the truth about a person even though you don t like him, * /I don t like Mr. Jones, but to give the devil his due, I must admit that he is a good teacher./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 16on the level — {adj. phr.}, {informal} Honest and fair; telling the whole truth. * /Our teacher respects the students who are on the level with her./ * /Joyce wondered if the fortune teller was on the level./ …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 17shoot from the hip — {v. phr.}, {informal} 1. To fire a gun held at the hip without aiming by aligning the barrel with one s eye. * /In many Western movies the heroic sheriff defeats the villains by shooting from the hip./ 2. To speak sincerely, frankly, and without… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 18the score — {n.}, {slang} The truth; the real story or information; what is really happening; the way people and the world really are. * /Very few people know the score in politics./ * /You are too young to know the score yet./ * /What s the score anyhow?… …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 19truth — See: CHILDREN AND FOOLS SPEAK THE TRUTH …

    Dictionary of American idioms

  • 20wide of the mark — {adv.} or {adj. phr.} 1. Far from the target or the thing aimed at. * /James threw a stone at the cat but it went wide of the mark./ 2. Far from the truth; incorrect. * /You were wide of the mark when you said I did it, because Bill did it./… …

    Dictionary of American idioms